2002
DOI: 10.1590/s0001-37652002000400010 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Bilaterally symmetric organisms need to exchange information between the left and right sides of their bodies to integrate sensory input and to coordinate motor control. Thus, an important choice point for developing axons is the Central Nervous System (CNS) midline. Crossing of this choice point is influenced by highly conserved, soluble or membrane-bound molecules such as the L1 subfamily, laminin, netrins, slits, semaphorins, Eph-receptors and ephrins, etc. Furthermore, there is much circumstantial evidence… Show more

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“…Four distinct immunoreactive patterns can be organized in developing rat brain: small and large punctiform laminin, sheath laminin, and somal laminin on the ECM (Zhou, 1990) with unique spatial and temporal distributions. Our previous study demonstrated that fibrillar or punctuate glial‐ECM laminin organization is related to different degrees of neurite extension (Garcia‐Abreu et al, 1995a; Freire et al, 2002; for a review, see Cavalcante et al, 2002). Here, we verified that levels of laminin expression seem to be higher in Gbm than in glial cells.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
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“…Four distinct immunoreactive patterns can be organized in developing rat brain: small and large punctiform laminin, sheath laminin, and somal laminin on the ECM (Zhou, 1990) with unique spatial and temporal distributions. Our previous study demonstrated that fibrillar or punctuate glial‐ECM laminin organization is related to different degrees of neurite extension (Garcia‐Abreu et al, 1995a; Freire et al, 2002; for a review, see Cavalcante et al, 2002). Here, we verified that levels of laminin expression seem to be higher in Gbm than in glial cells.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…During early embryonic CNS development in the drosophila, glial cells were found to express the chemo-attractant netrin (Jacobs, 2000) and the chemorepellents Slit and semaphorin (Kidd et al, 1999), all three necessary for accurate axon navigation and midline crossing of commissural axons (Kidd et al, 1998). In vertebrates, glial-like floor plate cells of the spinal cord, Cajal-Retzius cells, subplate cells, and oligodendrocytes precursor cells (OPCs) have been suggested to take part in this prenatal guidance role (Cavalcante et al, 2002; Goldberg et al, 2004), but a role for microglia and astrocytes cannot be excluded either and will be discussed here.…”
Section: The Role Of Glia In Axonal Outgrowth and Guidancementioning
“…Glia have the ability to either directly interact with growing axons through cell adhesion or indirectly by secreting factors that modulate the local microenvironment to promote or inhibit axon growth. Many glial subtypes have been demonstrated to directly impact axon growth and guidance including microglia (Reemst et al, 2016), oligodendrocytes (Chen et al, 2002a;Gang et al, 2015), astrocytes (Cavalcante et al, 2002;Liu R. et al, 2015), Schwann cells (Thompson and Buettner, 2006;De Luca et al, 2015), neural progenitor cells (Merianda et al, 2017), and olfactory ensheathing cells (Windus et al, 2010), and they can either promote or inhibit growth depending on the circumstance. Expanding the knowledge of how different supporting cell types may directly or indirectly interact with growing axons will offer a deeper understanding of the intercellular crosstalk occurring in neurodevelopment, as well as provide clinically useful information, such as identifying potential drugs to modulate neuron regeneration (De Luca et al, 2015;Gang et al, 2015).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning