2020
DOI: 10.3390/polym12123051
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Abstract: This review considers the main properties of fish gelatin that determine its use in food technologies. A comparative analysis of the amino acid composition of gelatin from cold-water and warm-water fish species, in comparison with gelatin from mammals, which is traditionally used in the food industry, is presented. Fish gelatin is characterized by a reduced content of proline and hydroxyproline which are responsible for the formation of collagen-like triple helices. For this reason, fish gelatin gels are less … Show more

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Cited by 23 publications
(20 citation statements)
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References 65 publications
(176 reference statements)
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“…Collagen consists of a triple helix of peptides of around 100 kDa (α-chains), assembled in the extracellular matrix into aggregates forming fibrils [ 1 ]. Disruption of the triple helix structure turns very insoluble collagen into soluble gelatin, a more tractable material that has found many applications in the food, pharmaceutical, and biomedical industries [ 2 , 3 , 4 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Sources of commercial gelatin comprise mostly pig and cattle bones, skins, and hides, but growing interest exists in fish gelatin. On the one hand, as a substitute of terrestrial animals for cultural reasons, but also as properties of fish gelatins, different to those of mammalian counterparts, may better suit particular applications [ 2 , 3 ]. As a result, many works have dealt with the extraction and properties of gelatin from a wide range of fish species [ 5 , 6 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The main sources of gelatin are bovine skin, bovine hides, and cattle and pork bones, whereas fish and poultry gelatins are used to a limited extent [ 1 ]. Gelatin from cold-water fish contains a lower percentage of proline and hydroxyproline which are involved in the formation of collagen-like triple helices and therefore has inferior gelation properties in comparison with mammalian gelatins [ 1 , 2 ]. Being biocompatible (included in FDA’s GRAS list), low-immunogenic, cheap, and commonly available biopolymer gelatin gains popularity in biomedicine, biotechnology, and food science [ 3 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…[35] Mammalian-derived gelatin is another example of a thermoresponsive naturally derived polymer that can experience reversible sol-gel transitions upon temperature variations (at temperatures above 30 °C, gelatin is in a soluble state, while at temperatures below 25 °C gelatin is in a gel state). [61] Importantly, these temperature ranges are highly dependent on gelatin origin, with fish skin gelatin presenting an entirely different temperature profile (for example, 4-8 °C gelling and 16-18 °C melting [90] ), which is also dependent on the type of fish living areas (i.e., cold or warm water).…”
Section: Stimuli Classificationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The main sources of gelatin are bovine skin, bovine hides, and cattle and pork bones, whereas fish and poultry gelatines are used to a limited extent (Gomez-Guillen, 2011). Gelatin from cold-water fish contains a lower percentage of proline and hydroxyproline which are involved in the formation of collagen-like triple helices and therefore has inferior gelation properties in comparison with mammalian gelatins (Gomez-Guillen, 2011, Derkach, 2020. Being biocompatible (included in FDA's GRAS list), low-immunogenic, cheap, and commonly available biopolymer gelatin gains popularity in biomedicine, biotechnology, and food science (Khan, 2020).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%