2014
DOI: 10.3922/j.psns.2014.036
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Metacognition and attribution of difficulty for self and others in Alzheimer’s disease.

Abstract: A common feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is lack of awareness of neuropsychological deficit or illness, including poor appreciation of impaired task performance. Nevertheless, it has been shown in different clinical groups that levels of awareness may vary according to whether appraisal of symptoms is made in a first-or third-person perspective. This study explored this issue further in two experiments in which people with AD and control participants completed tests of memory and reaction time and had to j… Show more

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Cited by 11 publications
(17 citation statements)
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“…Ramachandran & Rogers-Ramachandran (1996) showed that patients suffering from anosognosia for hemiplegia were able to acknowledge the paralysis of others, even when they were unaware of their own paralysis. In the context of dementia, a few studies have explored the issue of perspective taking with regard to metacognitive abilities by asking people with dementia to evaluate the performance of their relatives or of a fictional person suffering from dementia (Clare et al, 2012; Duke, Seltzer, Seltzer, & Vasterling, 2002; Mograbi, Brown, Landeira-Fernandez, & Morris, 2014). The results indicate that people with dementia were generally accurate in predicting the performance of someone else (e.g., caregiver or fictional person), despite difficulties in evaluating their own performance, especially regarding memory.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Ramachandran & Rogers-Ramachandran (1996) showed that patients suffering from anosognosia for hemiplegia were able to acknowledge the paralysis of others, even when they were unaware of their own paralysis. In the context of dementia, a few studies have explored the issue of perspective taking with regard to metacognitive abilities by asking people with dementia to evaluate the performance of their relatives or of a fictional person suffering from dementia (Clare et al, 2012; Duke, Seltzer, Seltzer, & Vasterling, 2002; Mograbi, Brown, Landeira-Fernandez, & Morris, 2014). The results indicate that people with dementia were generally accurate in predicting the performance of someone else (e.g., caregiver or fictional person), despite difficulties in evaluating their own performance, especially regarding memory.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The authors explained that the different findings between their results and Clare et al (2012a) were attributable to methodological differences. Indeed, in Mograbi et al (2014), the cognitive demand of the task, where participants had to imagine themselves as someone else, was higher than in Clare et al (2012a), in which patients did have access to written vignettes. Altogether, these results suggest that patients with AD are more accurate when evaluating the performance of someone else (e.g., caregiver or fictional person) than they are for themselves.…”
Section: Relationship Between Metacognition and Perspective-takingmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Based on the evaluation of a third person, Mograbi et al (2014) investigated the attribution of difficulty for the self and for others. Patients with AD were asked to judge how difficult a task was for them and would be for someone else their own age.…”
Section: Relationship Between Metacognition and Perspective-takingmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Behavioural manifestations of unawareness range from an inability to recognize the severity of memory impairment to a complete denial of problems . Importantly, a lack of awareness of memory impairment is likely to impede early treatment of dementia with negative downstream effects on dementia prognosis, patient safety, and quality of life …”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Previous research identified a positive relationship between unawareness of memory impairment and dementia severity . Research has suggested that unawareness of memory impairment is a neurocognitive deficit with underlying neurobiological causes in older adults with severe dementia . As dementia is likely to result in pathological deficits in parts of the brain over time, the gradual loss of cognitive reserve may contribute to higher levels of unawareness of memory impairment at later stages of the disease .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%