2013
DOI: 10.18632/aging.100594
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Abstract: Despite evidence from family studies that there is a strong genetic influence upon exceptional longevity, relatively few genetic variants have been associated with this trait. One reason could be that many genes individually have such weak effects that they cannot meet standard thresholds of genome wide significance, but as a group in specific combinations of genetic variations, they can have a strong influence. Previously we reported that such genetic signatures of 281 genetic markers associated with about 13… Show more

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Cited by 77 publications
(51 citation statements)
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References 34 publications
(51 reference statements)
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“…That this survival advantage is likely to have a genetic component is suggested by results from the New England Centenarian Study (NECS). The NECS discovered genetic profiles, based upon a set of 281 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), that can accurately differentiate between centenarians and general population controls [22,23]. While the accuracy of this differentiation is about 60% for participants who are 100 years old, it increases to 85% for centenarians aged 106 years and older.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…That this survival advantage is likely to have a genetic component is suggested by results from the New England Centenarian Study (NECS). The NECS discovered genetic profiles, based upon a set of 281 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), that can accurately differentiate between centenarians and general population controls [22,23]. While the accuracy of this differentiation is about 60% for participants who are 100 years old, it increases to 85% for centenarians aged 106 years and older.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In a large meta analysis of centenarian cohorts, many of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) linked to longevity with the greatest significance were linked negatively to AD and coronary heart disease 28 . Interestingly, healthy ageing—that is, ageing without developing a disease—does not seem to be linked to longevity genes; instead, it might be associated with the absence of risk factors for AD and cardiovascular disease 24 .…”
Section: Causes Of Brain Ageing and Neurodegenerationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The group that reported a combinational effect of 281 SNPs from a GWAS performed a meta-analysis using 4 GWAS of Caucasian populations (ELIX, Elixir Pharmaceutical Longevity Study; LLFS, Long Life Family Study; NECS, New England Centenarian Study; SICS, Southern Italian Centenarian Study) and 1 GWAS of Japanese population (JCS, Japanese Centenarian Study) by 3 different genetic models: additive, recessive and dominant model [24]. From the analyses of 4 Caucasian populations, they found 16 SNPs that reached Bonferroni corrected significance including a SNP in LMNA .…”
Section: Genome Maintenance In Gwasmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…They identified several longevity associated SNPs, and additionally a longevity associated haplotype of 4 SNPs. Among these 4 LMNA SNPs, there were a coding SNP shown to be associated with increased expression of LMNA [28] and an intronic SNP shown to be associated with longevity in a GWAS and meta-analysis by Sebastiani et al [23,24]. …”
Section: Genome Maintenance In Candidate Gene Approachesmentioning
confidence: 99%