2015
DOI: 10.1016/j.ejogrb.2015.04.017
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Menopausal stages and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in middle-aged women

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Cited by 46 publications
(41 citation statements)
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References 44 publications
(62 reference statements)
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“…Both human and rodent studies provide evidence for a protective effect of estrogen and testosterone on the development of fatty liver (15)(16)(17)(19)(20)(21). We set out to investigate the effect of gonadectomy in three different strains of both sexes.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Both human and rodent studies provide evidence for a protective effect of estrogen and testosterone on the development of fatty liver (15)(16)(17)(19)(20)(21). We set out to investigate the effect of gonadectomy in three different strains of both sexes.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…NASH has been reported to be more prevalent in females than in males (11), and lean women appear to have a higher prevalence of NAFLD than lean men (14). Also, NAFLD has been shown to be more prevalent in post-as compared with premenopausal women, suggesting that sex hormones may influence the onset of NAFLD (15). The fact that breast cancer patients treated with an estrogen receptor antagonist develop massive hepatic steatosis and even typical NASH indicates that estrogen affects development of this disease (16).…”
Section: Accession Numbersmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In addition to and independent of the role of MetS and its components, menopausal status [49, 83, 85] and increasing age [49, 56, 82] have all been consistently identified as strong risk factors for NAFLD in women. Only in a few studies was the association between menopausal status and NAFLD no longer significant after adjustment for age and metabolic factors [37, 81], indicating that menopause predisposes to developing NAFLD via incident dysmetabolic traits which typically appear in the postmenopausal age.…”
Section: Epidemiology Of Nafldmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…One side effect of TMX is the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and steatohepatitis (Nishino et al 2003; Murata et al 2000; Oien et al 1999). As women transition to menopause, the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease increases (Ryu et al 2015; Yang et al 2014). Aging is a natural risk factor for NAFLD, which may confound the impact of menopause on risk of NAFLD.…”
Section: Lack Of Estrogen Signaling Promotes Liver Tg Accumulation Anmentioning
confidence: 99%