2021
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Abstract: The separation of germ cell populations from the soma is part of the evolutionary transition to multicellularity. Only genetic information present in the germ cells will be inherited by future generations, and any molecular processes affecting the germline genome are therefore likely to be passed on. Despite its prevalence across taxonomic kingdoms, we are only starting to understand details of the underlying micro-evolutionary processes occurring at the germline genome level. These include segregation, recomb… Show more

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Cited by 10 publications
(258 citation statements)
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References 253 publications
(258 reference statements)
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“…These factors could themselves determine specific locales and amount of DNA methylation or chromatin modifications shaping the quantitative differences we observed. However, this remains an open question, and the underlying molecular mechanisms that are responsible for these differences have yet to be identified (B ergero et al . 2021).…”
Section: Discusssionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These factors could themselves determine specific locales and amount of DNA methylation or chromatin modifications shaping the quantitative differences we observed. However, this remains an open question, and the underlying molecular mechanisms that are responsible for these differences have yet to be identified (B ergero et al . 2021).…”
Section: Discusssionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Indeed, a need for fast-dividing male germline cells would inevitably lead to an elevated risk of unrepaired replication errors in male gametes, all else equal, as the DNA-repair system must constantly attend single and double strand breaks that occur during meiosis and mitosis [39][40][41][42] and in postmeiotic chromatin remodelling during spermiogenesis 35,42,43 . This should result in a trade-off between increased male germline replication rates, granting greater success in sperm competition, and increased germline mutation rate, reducing offspring quality 8,39,[44][45][46][47] . This potential feedback loop between the strength of sexual selection and male mutation rate has implications for mate choice processes 8,31,46,[48][49][50] .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This male mutation bias has been ascribed to the greater number of cell divisions occurring in the male germline prior to fertilization, and the higher number of divisions in males is itself thought to be a result of anisogamy and sexual selection promoting increased gamete production in the sex competing most intensively for fertilization success [31,32]. Indeed, a need for fast-dividing male germline cells would inevitably lead to an elevated risk of unrepaired replication errors in male gametes, all else equal, as the DNA-repair system must constantly attend single and double strand breaks that occur during meiosis and mitosis [33][34][35][36] and in post-meiotic chromatin remodelling during spermiogenesis [29,36,37]. This should result in a trade-off between increased male germline replication rates, granting greater success in sperm competition, and increased germline mutation rate, reducing offspring quality [7,33,[38][39][40][41].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The recombinogenic effect of 'primary', physical stressors may arise from changes in biochemical pathways in the germline cells (reviewed in [8,9]). 'Higher-level', behavioural stressors, probably also involve complex soma-to-germline signalling, whose existence attaches ever-increasing attention, especially in the context of epigenetic variation [10][11][12][13].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%