2006
DOI: 10.1038/modpathol.3800518
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Medicolegal aspects of neoplastic dermatology

Abstract: Medical malpractice litigation is rising at an explosive rate in the US and, to a lesser extent, in Canada. The impact of medical malpractice litigation on health care costs and the cost of insurance is dramatic. Certain specialist categories are becoming uninsurable in some parts of the US, while in others, clinicians are retiring early, restricting or changing practice or changing states of residence in consequence of medical malpractice claims and of the cost and availability of insurance. This, in turn, ha… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1
1
1

Citation Types

2
19
0
1

Year Published

2008
2008
2021
2021

Publication Types

Select...
7
2

Relationship

0
9

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 28 publications
(22 citation statements)
references
References 51 publications
2
19
0
1
Order By: Relevance
“…The entity called naevoid melanoma (NeM) refers to a rare, diagnostically deceptive variant of melanoma that can mimic a naevus both clinically and histopathologically . The normal‐appearing architectural structure and the bland cytological features can resemble those of a dermal naevus, leading to misdiagnosis, with eventual recognition of the true nature of the lesion after it has metastasized or recurred.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The entity called naevoid melanoma (NeM) refers to a rare, diagnostically deceptive variant of melanoma that can mimic a naevus both clinically and histopathologically . The normal‐appearing architectural structure and the bland cytological features can resemble those of a dermal naevus, leading to misdiagnosis, with eventual recognition of the true nature of the lesion after it has metastasized or recurred.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Medical-legal cases involving nonmelanocytic lesions usually concern incorrect margin assessment, infiltrative neoplasms (e.g., squamous cell carcinoma with neurotropism), atypical intraepithelial proliferations (e.g., clonal Bowen's disease, porocarcinoma in situ), and misclassification of basal cell carcinoma variant (Crowson, 2006). Therefore, if the pathology report does not indicate the variant of basal cell carcinoma, the dermatology office could call the dermatopathologist and ask for the variant to be specified, provided the specimen submitted was not a superficial shave or minute fragments of a curetting.…”
Section: Discrepancies In Clinical Impression and Laboratory Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In 2004, Lydiatt analyzed 99 cases for allegations of negligence to diagnose skin cancer; the results showed that ''misdiagnosis'' and ''failure to diagnose'' accounted for 20% and 54% of the claims made, respectively. In a different study, issues surrounding melanoma were the second most common cause of malpractice litigation; the misdiagnosis of melanoma was found to account for 13% of all malpractice claims from 1995 to 2001 (Crowson, 2006). A close relationship between the dermatology office and the laboratory may enable a reduction of such claims.…”
mentioning
confidence: 97%
“…As for the trend of dermatological litigation in other countries, malignant melanoma is the chief source of malpractice claims in the specialty in the USA 15 . The two main causes for melanoma malpractice awards are delay in diagnosis and mistaken diagnosis which most typically present as an error by the histopathologist 16 . On the other hand, Drummond et al.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%