volume 4, issue 12, P899-916 2012
DOI: 10.18632/aging.100528
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Abstract: Males, who are bigger and stronger than females, die younger in most species from flies to mammals including humans. Cellular mass growth is driven in part by mTOR (Target of Rapamycin). When developmental growth is completed, then, instead of growth, mTOR drives aging, manifested by increased cellular functions, such as hyper-secretion by fibroblasts, thus altering homeostasis, leading to age-related diseases and death. We hypothesize that MTOR activity is elevated in male mice compared with females. Notewort…

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