2009
DOI: 10.1177/193672440900300203
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Abstract: The demography of a local population is a central aspect of applied social science research. Although birth and death rates influence a population, the key contributing factor influencing the demographics of a locality is almost always internal migration—the movement of persons between U.S. regions, states, and localities. Current definitions of internal migration used by the U.S. Census Bureau are limited because confidentiality restrictions require that detailed current and former place of residence geograph… Show more

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Cited by 10 publications
(9 citation statements)
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References 27 publications
(21 reference statements)
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“…Thus, expression (5) in Lewbel (2007) suggests that misclassification may attenuate the estimated effects of conscription by just about 5%. Blanchard, and Irwin 2009). And third, the exhaustive partition of metropolitan France into 348 commuting zones that remained unaltered until 2010 removes concerns about identifying migrations consistently in different editions of Generation.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Thus, expression (5) in Lewbel (2007) suggests that misclassification may attenuate the estimated effects of conscription by just about 5%. Blanchard, and Irwin 2009). And third, the exhaustive partition of metropolitan France into 348 commuting zones that remained unaltered until 2010 removes concerns about identifying migrations consistently in different editions of Generation.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Business owners are grouped at the second level by a spatial measure of the local economy: commuting zones (CZs). Based on cluster models of intercounty journey‐to‐work patterns, these CZs have been widely used since the 1980s to better encompass the flow of economic activity across politically or arbitrarily drawn county lines (Killian and Tolbert ; Tolbert, Blanchard, and Irwin ) . The underlying commuting data are county‐to‐county journey‐to‐work tabulations from decennial censuses (census 2000 in this case).…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The 741 spatial units cover the entire USA, including metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas, and correspond to local labour markets. They were based on a set of spatial units that Tolbert, Blanchard, and Irwin (, ) developed by using cluster analysis to identify contiguous counties that had close socio‐economic linkages and commuting patterns in 1990. To obtain a set of geographic areas that had the same boundaries in 1990, 2000, and 2007–2011, a small number of county adjustments were made.…”
Section: Data and Measurementmentioning
confidence: 99%