2016
DOI: 10.18632/aging.100919
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Abstract: Caloric restriction and genetic disruption of growth hormone signaling have been shown to counteract aging in mice. The effects of these interventions on aging are examined through age-dependent survival or through the increase in age-dependent mortality rates on a logarithmic scale fitted to the Gompertz model. However, these methods have limitations that impede a fully comprehensive disclosure of these effects. Here we examine the effects of these interventions on murine aging through the increase in age-dep… Show more

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Cited by 25 publications
(66 citation statements)
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References 31 publications
(66 reference statements)
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“…These patterns are consistent with the effects on lifespan and survival discussed above. Moreover, these effects of GH are consistent with the effect of reduced GH signaling in other mutant mice, which have aging rates that increase at the advanced ages to a higher level relative to control mice (Koopman et al, 2016).
10.7554/eLife.24059.005Figure 3.Age-dependent aging rates of the groups of mice in the first week ( A ) and the second week ( B ) GH treatment groups.The aging rates describe the increases in the mortality rates with age and are expressed in deaths per 10,000 mice per day, which equals the change in mortality rate per day.
…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 78%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…These patterns are consistent with the effects on lifespan and survival discussed above. Moreover, these effects of GH are consistent with the effect of reduced GH signaling in other mutant mice, which have aging rates that increase at the advanced ages to a higher level relative to control mice (Koopman et al, 2016).
10.7554/eLife.24059.005Figure 3.Age-dependent aging rates of the groups of mice in the first week ( A ) and the second week ( B ) GH treatment groups.The aging rates describe the increases in the mortality rates with age and are expressed in deaths per 10,000 mice per day, which equals the change in mortality rate per day.
…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 78%
“…We employed a non-parametric method, explained and applied previously (Koopman et al, 2016). In the first week GH treatment protocol (between postnatal first and seventh week), GH treated dwarf mice had aging rates that increased at younger ages to a lower level relative to saline-treated dwarf mice (Figure 3A).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Both Ames dwarf and GHR−/− mice are remarkably long‐lived, with increases in longevity ranging from some 20% to over 60% depending on the diet, gender, and genetic background of the animal (Brown‐Borg et al ., ; Coschigano et al ., ; Bartke et al ., ). The enhancement of longevity in these mice is associated with maintenance of youthful levels of cognitive and neuromuscular function, and other phenotypic characteristics into advanced age (Bartke et al ., ), delayed onset, and reduced incidence of cancer and other age‐related pathological changes (Ikeno et al ., ; Bartke et al ., ), and a reduced rate of aging (Koopman et al ., ). We have previously proposed that the activation of BAT and increased metabolic rate in these long‐lived mice represent responses to increased radiational heat loss in these diminutive animals (Westbrook, ; Darcy et al ., ).…”
mentioning
confidence: 97%
“…The conclusion that the biological process of aging is indeed slower in the absence of GH signals is supported by the evidence that the age-related changes in cognitive and musculoskeletal function, glucose homeostasis and risk of cancer are delayed and/or diminished in GH-related mutants compared to normal animals from the same strain [reviewed in 43, 4449]. Recent analysis of survival curves of GHR−/− and GHRH−/− mice revealed that their mortality rate (arguably the most meaningful measure of aging) is lower in these mutants than in the normal mice, and that its age-related acceleration is correspondingly delayed [50]. …”
Section: Evidence That Gh Can Accelerate Agingmentioning
confidence: 99%