2000
DOI: 10.1590/s0037-86822000000100008 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: According to epidemiological data, from 1980 to 1994, 2,781 cases of malaria were registered as follows: DIR XII-Campinas (49.3%), DIR XV-Piracicaba (41.3%) and DIR XX-São João da Boa Vista (9.4%). The Plasmodium vivax was found in 70.6% of the patients; Plasmodium falciparum in 25.4% and 4% of the patients presented a mixed infection. The epidemiological classification showed that 95% of the cases came from the States of Rondônia, Mato Grosso and Par. The masculine sex, between the age of 20 to 39 years old, … Show more

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“…This result supports other studies conducted in SP (Wanderley et al 1985, 1994), MG (Chaves et al 1995) and SC (Machado et al 2003). The higher proportion of malaria cases in men may be because they travel to endemic areas to work in high-risk occupations such as mining, farming and timber extraction (Alves et al 2000). Although the highest proportion of malaria cases in the Amazon still occurs among men, the percentage decreased from 65.1% in 2003 to 61.4% in 2008, showing significant differences in the period (p = 0.000) (Couto et al 2010, MS/SVS 2013).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…The greater number of P. falcipa- rum imported cases in these countries has been attributed to the increase in international travel, especially to and from West Africa. Several studies conducted in other extra-Amazonian regions showed different results, with a predominance of P. vivax following the national burden (Wanderley et al 1994, Chaves et al 1995, Alves et al 2000, Bértoli & Moitinho 2001, Machado et al 2003, Falavigna-Guilherme et al 2005, Couto et al 2010, MS/SVS 2013). Moreover, it should be noted that four of the eight cases caused by P. malariae reported in RJ were autochthonous.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…This study found a prevalence of CM of 4.3% among newborns from mothers with MIP in the Urabá region. Such frequency was similar to that found in Nigeria by Falade et al , who identified a 5.1% parasitaemia in samples from newborns whose mothers had suffered from MIP [11], and to the prevalence of 3.3% (1/30) found by Fernández et al in Honduras in 2001 [16], but greater than that reported by Alves et al in Brazil, who found just one case of CM in 2,781 cases of malaria between 1980 and 1994 in the Campinas region [15]. 80% (four out of five) of CM cases in this study were caused by P. vivax , the Plasmodium responsible for most of the malaria cases in the Americas [32].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…However, since 1985 there have been reports of a CM incidence ranging from 4.9% to 54.2% in regions of Africa with stable malaria transmission, where it is more likely that the pregnant women have acquired immunity to prevent mother-to-child transmission [6-11]. The few reports in Latin America include some cases from Brazil, Mexico and Honduras [12-15], and a case-control study that reported a congenital infection incidence of 3.3% [16]. In Colombia, 12 cases were reported before 1986 [17] and there is a recent report on five cases of severe neonatal malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax , one of them with congenital infection based on epidemiological criteria [18].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…A surveillance system should be established and prepared to successfully overcome challenges associated with asymptomatic or oligosymptomatic Plasmodium infections [ 55 ] occurring in these regions. Since the 1980s, there has been a need for comprehensive serological studies in some areas with high-risk clusters [ 56 ]. Preventive active search may be a tool for the epidemiological surveillance of AU malaria.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning