volume 5, issue 2, P55-64 2009
DOI: 10.1177/174701610900500204
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Abstract: Historically people with learning difficulties 1 have been either included in research without their consent or excluded from research that affects their treatment and care. Over the last 20 years, however, it has been recognised that to exclude the voice of people with learning difficulties (and other so called vulnerable groups) in research that reflects their lived experiences challenges our notion of ethical practice. Cognitive ability has traditionally been one of the key factors in determining ability t…

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