1983
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.119.1.61
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Lupus erythematosus panniculitis

Abstract: A young woman had a history of subcutaneous nodules, migratory arthralgia, myalgia, and lymphadenopathy. Histopathologic characteristics of the nodular subcutaneous lesion showed a massive lobular panniculitis characteristic of lupus erythematosus (LE) panniculitis. The diagnosis of LE panniculitis was established by demonstration of a positive linear basement membrane zone stain of the involved skin by direct immunofluorescence microscopy. Initial serologic findings showed negative antinuclear antibody (ANA) … Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1

Citation Types

0
4
0

Year Published

1985
1985
2012
2012

Publication Types

Select...
7

Relationship

0
7

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 11 publications
(4 citation statements)
references
References 0 publications
0
4
0
Order By: Relevance
“…The rare association between diseases of autoimmune basis and hemifacial atrophy could be coincidental or secondary to a slowly progressive autodistruptive process, as strongly suspected for connective tissue diseases [61,69,84,92]; and it must be differentiated from the fibrotic atrophy following panniculitis by Lupus and other connective tissue disease whose onset shows large, painful, nodular or diffuse infiltrating chronic inflammation of deep subcutaneous tissue with fatty necrosis and degeneration greater than that generally reported in the autoimmunity connective tissue diseases [35,52,89]. Therefore, although Parry-Romberg, Multifocal Scleroderma and Autoimmune Diseases are distinct entities of PHA, there might be a line of union: a local or general neurodystrophy or any reduced vitality of peripheral tissues, apparently silent in most affected people, may however appear in relation to stress; but, if a subclinical autoimmune disorder suddenly overthrows the precarious state of a latent or slowly degenerative neurotic or tissue dystrophy, then a severe atrophic disease could break out with several pathologic implications.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 93%
“…The rare association between diseases of autoimmune basis and hemifacial atrophy could be coincidental or secondary to a slowly progressive autodistruptive process, as strongly suspected for connective tissue diseases [61,69,84,92]; and it must be differentiated from the fibrotic atrophy following panniculitis by Lupus and other connective tissue disease whose onset shows large, painful, nodular or diffuse infiltrating chronic inflammation of deep subcutaneous tissue with fatty necrosis and degeneration greater than that generally reported in the autoimmunity connective tissue diseases [35,52,89]. Therefore, although Parry-Romberg, Multifocal Scleroderma and Autoimmune Diseases are distinct entities of PHA, there might be a line of union: a local or general neurodystrophy or any reduced vitality of peripheral tissues, apparently silent in most affected people, may however appear in relation to stress; but, if a subclinical autoimmune disorder suddenly overthrows the precarious state of a latent or slowly degenerative neurotic or tissue dystrophy, then a severe atrophic disease could break out with several pathologic implications.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 93%
“…Lupus erythematosus profundus (12)(13)(14) is a rare form of DLE characterized clinically by deep inflammatory nodules and plaques that resemble an early localized nonsuppurative panniculitis, such as morphea. The overlying skin may appear normal, have the changes of DLE, or be poikilodermatous.…”
Section: Chronic Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosusmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Additionally, LEP is reported to occur in 2–3% of patients with SLE 12,16 . The literature suggests up to 35% of LEP patients will have a preceding, concurrent or subsequent diagnosis of SLE, thus patients with LEP should be followed for development of SLE, although most patients will not have systemic manifestation 11,17 . When patients with LEP do have SLE, they tend to have a less severe phenotype 13,14,18 , although reports of aggressive generalized LEP lesions in the setting of SLE have been reported and argue for prompt initiation of systemic treatment 3 .…”
Section: Lupus Panniculitis/lupus Profundusmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Antimalarials have a long history of use with successful clearing of lesions of LEP and lupus profundus in adults and in children. They are considered first line therapy for most cases of LEP 1,6,10,12,13,1517,27 . Hydroxychloroquine is typically given at a dose of < 6.5 mg/kg/day based on ideal body weight.…”
Section: Lupus Panniculitis/lupus Profundusmentioning
confidence: 99%