2018
DOI: 10.20945/2359-3997000000047
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Abstract: Our results suggest that weight regain after RYGB has no significant impact on the long-term evolution of the lipid profile and glycemia.

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Cited by 2 publications
(31 citation statements)
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“…5 16 Although an association between T2D relapse and weight regain has been suggested in some studies, [17][18][19] others have not found any association between the degree of long-term weight loss and cardiometabolic outcome. [20][21][22] The annual summary of the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry (SOReg) recently described an association between baseline T2D and inadequate postoperative weight loss. 23 In this study, based on a large cohort of patients prospectively collected in SOReg, 6 we report on the heterogeneity of weight loss outcome, focusing primarily on the occurrence of surgical treatment failure 5 years after surgery, according to any of three published definitions.…”
Section: Open Accessmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…5 16 Although an association between T2D relapse and weight regain has been suggested in some studies, [17][18][19] others have not found any association between the degree of long-term weight loss and cardiometabolic outcome. [20][21][22] The annual summary of the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry (SOReg) recently described an association between baseline T2D and inadequate postoperative weight loss. 23 In this study, based on a large cohort of patients prospectively collected in SOReg, 6 we report on the heterogeneity of weight loss outcome, focusing primarily on the occurrence of surgical treatment failure 5 years after surgery, according to any of three published definitions.…”
Section: Open Accessmentioning
confidence: 99%