2015
DOI: 10.1590/1414-431x20154473
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Abstract: Understanding the effects of radiation and its possible influence on the nervous system are of great clinical interest. However, there have been few electrophysiological studies on brain activity after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). A new methodological approach regarding the assessment of the possible effects of IR on brain activity is the use of linear and nonlinear mathematical methods in the analysis of complex time series, such as brain oscillations measured using the electrocorticogram (ECoG). The … Show more

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Cited by 6 publications
(37 citation statements)
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References 35 publications
(37 reference statements)
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“…Both acute and long-term negative impacts on synaptic efficacy (ability of the tissue to transmit synaptic potentials) and spike generation (ability of those synaptic potentials to generate spikes) were observed. Additionally, an electrocorticogram brain activity study on rats showed changes in the pattern of recordings, particularly of the theta waves, at 24 hours and persisting to 90 days after exposure to 18 Gy of gamma radiation [11]. The scarcity and inconsistent findings from earlier electrophysiological studies was taken into consideration for the experimental design in the present study.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Both acute and long-term negative impacts on synaptic efficacy (ability of the tissue to transmit synaptic potentials) and spike generation (ability of those synaptic potentials to generate spikes) were observed. Additionally, an electrocorticogram brain activity study on rats showed changes in the pattern of recordings, particularly of the theta waves, at 24 hours and persisting to 90 days after exposure to 18 Gy of gamma radiation [11]. The scarcity and inconsistent findings from earlier electrophysiological studies was taken into consideration for the experimental design in the present study.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The exposure of rats to IR in the head and neck regions at doses of 18 Gy promoted significant changes in the power of theta wave when the animals were evaluated 24 h and 90 days after exposure, demonstrating changes in the animals cortical activity resulting from the effects of radiation on brain tissue [ 11 ]. According to these authors, the theta wave can be considered as a possible exposure biomarker for IR, due to the greater sensitivity of this brain rhythm in relation to the others.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The DFA is a non-linear method based on fluctuation analysis of the data after the removal of trends in an integrated time series [ 11 ]. This series integrated is described as follows equation (1) : where M is the mean value of the original series y(i), with i = 1, 2, …, N and k is an integer number.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the cognitive deficits after brain radiotherapy remain controversial and the clinical prevention and treatment approaches remain limited. [ 1,2 ]…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the cognitive deficits after brain radiotherapy remain controversial and the clinical prevention and treatment approaches remain limited. [1,2] Recent research on RAD-induced brain injury has benefited from using animal models. In particular, rats have been used to elicit a variety of pathological changes (eg, vascular lesions, edema, necrosis, and demyelination).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%