2003
DOI: 10.1177/153331750301800503
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Abstract: A growing number of Americans are managing and monitoring long-distance caregiving for an elderly parent. The authors offer a first-hand experience of caregiving involving an African-American family, which will be useful to both caregivers and practitioners. The challenges that result from long-distance caregiving are discussed. A detailed case study and assessment is followed by suggested strategies for lessening caregiver stress.

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Cited by 19 publications
(19 citation statements)
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References 32 publications
(24 reference statements)
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“…Collins and co-authors (2003) provided a first-hand account of the trials and travails of being a long distance caregiver within an African American family. This personal reflection highlighted a desire to keep the care recipient at home; the limited availability of services; and avoidance of formal care resulting in heavy initial reliance on informal support systems (i.e., a network of friends, neighbors and family).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Collins and co-authors (2003) provided a first-hand account of the trials and travails of being a long distance caregiver within an African American family. This personal reflection highlighted a desire to keep the care recipient at home; the limited availability of services; and avoidance of formal care resulting in heavy initial reliance on informal support systems (i.e., a network of friends, neighbors and family).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Despite the distances associated with LDCs, adult children who move away are, generally, still expected to maintain contact with their frail or ailing parent(s) (e.g., Collins et al, 2003); however, the nature, frequency, consequences and burden of maintaining contact are qualitatively different. Although LDCs make fewer face-to-face contacts with their care recipients as compared to proximate caregivers (Joseph & Hallman, 1998), and the primary forms of contact are by telephone or e-mail (Roff et al, 2003), contacts are frequent, with the vast majority of participants writing or calling their parents almost weekly (Parker et al).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…As with caregiving in general, there are numerous examples of publications that attempt to provide support and strategies for the long distance caregiver (e.g., Harvard Women's Health Watch, April 2004; American Association of Retired Persons 1986;Heath 1993;Kalter 1997;Collins et al 2003). Plowfield et al (2000) do not provide any empirical data, but they do include distance as a factor when discussing the elements of a comprehensive, accurate geriatric assessment.…”
Section: Guidance For Long Distance Caregiversmentioning
confidence: 97%