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“…The danger of performing laparoscopy was said to lie in the possibility of instruments perforating the bowel with the release of flammable gases into the peritoneal cavity and these being vulnerable to ignition by faulty electrical instrumentation. The incidence of bowel perforation in this way is thought to be approximately 2% [24]. In the early days of laparoscopy, air was used as the insufflating gas, and while nitrogen in air might quench the explosivity of any flammable gas present, the danger of air embolism was considered too great a risk and it was superseded by nitrous oxide.…”
Section: Laparoscopymentioning
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“…The danger of performing laparoscopy was said to lie in the possibility of instruments perforating the bowel with the release of flammable gases into the peritoneal cavity and these being vulnerable to ignition by faulty electrical instrumentation. The incidence of bowel perforation in this way is thought to be approximately 2% [24]. In the early days of laparoscopy, air was used as the insufflating gas, and while nitrogen in air might quench the explosivity of any flammable gas present, the danger of air embolism was considered too great a risk and it was superseded by nitrous oxide.…”
Section: Laparoscopymentioning
“…How frequently the large bowel is perforated by laparoscopic diathermy is not known. Steptoe (1976) alleges an incidence of perforation of 2%, but he does not distinguish between different parts of the bowel, nor give any direct evidence. Rapid combustion of 40 ml of hydrogen would increase the temperature enough to increase the intra-abdominal pressure by about 150 cm H 2 O (14.72 kPa); this increase is likely to be transient, but nevertheless is not one to be viewed with equanimity.…”
Section: Laparoscopymentioning