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citations
Cited by 115 publications
(49 citation statements)
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References 43 publications
(49 reference statements)
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“…Pb oxychlorides were detected in dust particles emitted from a lead smelter (Sobanska et al, 1999;Wu, Biswas, 2000). Pb halides (chloride-bromides) as well as oxy-and hydroxyhalides were observed in automobile exhaust gases (Post, Buseck, 1985) and roadside soils (Smith, 1976). However, Pb oxyhalides have not only environmental importance and are also of interest from the viewpoint of material science as anisotropic materials with a variety of physical properties that depend strongly on the crystallographic direction.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Pb oxychlorides were detected in dust particles emitted from a lead smelter (Sobanska et al, 1999;Wu, Biswas, 2000). Pb halides (chloride-bromides) as well as oxy-and hydroxyhalides were observed in automobile exhaust gases (Post, Buseck, 1985) and roadside soils (Smith, 1976). However, Pb oxyhalides have not only environmental importance and are also of interest from the viewpoint of material science as anisotropic materials with a variety of physical properties that depend strongly on the crystallographic direction.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…While there has been some studies on the effects of industrially derived heavy metal pollution on leaf surface microorganisms (Gingell et al 1976, Bewley 1980, little work has been done on the effects of heavy metal and trace contaminants on leaf surface microorganisms in the roadside urban environment in general (Smith 1971, Smith 1976a, Smith 1976b, Smith 1977, Swailesh et al 2004) and on the effects of vehicular pollution on phylloplane microorganisms in particular (Mowll et al 1985) Therefore, a study to understand the impact of vehicular air pollution on the phylloplane microorganisms of roadside trees (Alnus nepalensis) was carried out.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…They gave 2 possible hypothesis for this positive relationship: (i) the application of different quantities of organic matter polluted with metals caused, over time, an increase in these elements in the soil, with the highest levels in soils treated with the largest amounts of organic matter, (ii) the metal content of the most polluted soils has interfered with C mineralisation, leading gradually to accumulation of organic C in these soils. Earlier studies have shown that the deposition of Pb from vehicle exhaust and fumes and abraded metals from vehicle components has resulted in metal contamination of roadside soils and vegetation (Lagerwerff and Specht, 1970;Smith, 1976;Harris, 1991). Post and Beeby (1996) studied rates of degradation of cellulose-strips and decomposition of litter bags in roadside soils of low and high metal concentrations.…”
Section: Organic Matter Decompositionmentioning
confidence: 99%