2021
DOI: 10.1002/bbb.2270
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Land use change: the barrier for sugarcane sustainability

Abstract: Bioethanol production in Brazil gained momentum in the 1970s and 1980s as an energy security and energy sufficiency measure due to the well‐known world oil crisis. However, the increase in bioethanol production and consumption in the past couple of decades has been backed by the country's efforts and measures to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the transport sector. Brazil is the second largest producer of biofuels, and its production continues to increase because of the commitments made in the Paris A… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
3

Citation Types

0
3
0

Year Published

2022
2022
2024
2024

Publication Types

Select...
6
1

Relationship

0
7

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 10 publications
(3 citation statements)
references
References 49 publications
0
3
0
Order By: Relevance
“…However, the wider impacts of such a pathway have been extensively discussed, showing the complexity of consequences of sugarcane expansion for land-use and the agricultural sector 7 – 9 . Sugarcane plantations expand to a large extent on pastures 10 , 11 , where the associated land-use change can cause soil biodiversity losses 12 and structural soil degradation 13 , as well as pollution and depletion of water resources 14 – 16 . Nevertheless, environmental concerns have been mostly linked to indirect land-use change, i.e., the process of sugarcane expansion on pastures drives the expansion of pasture areas into natural forests 17 , 18 .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, the wider impacts of such a pathway have been extensively discussed, showing the complexity of consequences of sugarcane expansion for land-use and the agricultural sector 7 – 9 . Sugarcane plantations expand to a large extent on pastures 10 , 11 , where the associated land-use change can cause soil biodiversity losses 12 and structural soil degradation 13 , as well as pollution and depletion of water resources 14 – 16 . Nevertheless, environmental concerns have been mostly linked to indirect land-use change, i.e., the process of sugarcane expansion on pastures drives the expansion of pasture areas into natural forests 17 , 18 .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Moreover, glucose represses xylose transport by the native transporters, limiting their use in mixed sugar fermentation (Subtil & Boles, 2012; Apel et al ., 2016; Patiño et al ., 2019). In an attempt to overcome this impasse and allow this microorganism successfully ferment the main fraction of hemicellulose expanding bioethanol production without increasing land use (Picoli & Machado, 2021), several studies have focused on bioprospecting and characterizing heterologous xylose-transporters in S. cerevisiae , providing several alternatives for efficient xylose uptake (Saloheimo et al ., 2007; Runquist et al ., 2009; Young et al ., 2011; Apel et al ., 2016; Podolsky et al ., 2021); in improving native transporters using a combination of bioinformatics and mutagenesis (Young et al ., 2011; Farwick et al ., 2014); and in applying adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) to generating evolved microbial strains with desired phenotypic traits (Sonderegger & Sauer, 2003; Lee, Jellison & Alper, 2012; Parreiras et al ., 2014; Borgström et al ., 2019).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is considered an important agricultural commodity (Picoli;Machado, 2021) and the interest in this culture has increased because of its importance in the production of renewable energy (Hammer;Sentelhas;Mariano, 2020;Walter et al, 2014). However, it is classified as glycophyte and moderately sensitive to salt stress (Melo et al, 2014).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%