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citations
Cited by 46 publications
(23 citation statements)
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References 32 publications
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“…Although individual segmental range of motion has been quantified for all spinal levels, 1 in vivo research from a biomechanical and motor control perspective has typically approximated the thoracolumbar spine [2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9] or the lumbar spine 10 -14 as a single segment. In a limited number of studies, the thoracolumbar spine has been segmented to yield one thoracic and one lumbar angle, 15,16 while other studies have used in vivo kinematics to determine regional movement in the thoracic spine 17 and the lumbar spine, 18 with the spine region under examination being divided into several segments.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Although individual segmental range of motion has been quantified for all spinal levels, 1 in vivo research from a biomechanical and motor control perspective has typically approximated the thoracolumbar spine [2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9] or the lumbar spine 10 -14 as a single segment. In a limited number of studies, the thoracolumbar spine has been segmented to yield one thoracic and one lumbar angle, 15,16 while other studies have used in vivo kinematics to determine regional movement in the thoracic spine 17 and the lumbar spine, 18 with the spine region under examination being divided into several segments.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These three techniques differ mainly in trunk and knee movements. Based on the results of former studies (Toussaint et al 1992, Trafimow et al 1993, Hagen et al 1995, Gagnon et al 1996, Gagnon 1997, it could be expected that a different joint kinetic might be reflected by the MAWL for each lifting technique. However, this appeared not to be the case.…”
Section: Low Back Versus Knee Kineticsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…(14) These variations may be related to, for example, size of the loads to be handled and the type box (with or without handles), (15) and the height that the load should be positioned. (16) In the literature can be found many studies that describe the postural strategies used by workers in different forms of loading boxes relating experiences gained and no experience, (4)(5)(6)(17)(18)(19) showing that there are still a need for studies that seek to identify individuals strategies, in order to prevent future injuries.…”
Section: )mentioning
confidence: 99%