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Cited by 16 publications
(9 citation statements)
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References 5 publications
(6 reference statements)
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“…The gene at the 11q13 breakpoint was cloned and first called PRAD1; its protein product was identified as a novel member of the cyclin family and a key regulator of cell cycle progression (Motokura et al 1991). Subsequently called cyclin D1, the canonical pathway for its action involves its direct binding to and activation of partner cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6 at the G1-to-S phase transition of the cell cycle (Sherr et al 2016), and considerable evidence points to important CDKindependent actions of cyclin D1 as well (Casimiro et al 2015). Rearrangements involving the CCND1 locus appear to occur in up to 8% of parathyroid adenomas (Yi et al 2008) and cyclin D1 protein overexpression occurs in 18-40% (Hsi et al 1996, Tominaga et al 1999, Vasef et al 1999, Hemmer et al 2001, Ikeda et al 2002, Alvelos et al 2013), suggesting the existence of additional, still unknown, genetic mechanisms that lead to cyclin D1 oncoprotein overexpression in these tumors ( Fig.…”
Section: Cyclin D1/ccnd1mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The gene at the 11q13 breakpoint was cloned and first called PRAD1; its protein product was identified as a novel member of the cyclin family and a key regulator of cell cycle progression (Motokura et al 1991). Subsequently called cyclin D1, the canonical pathway for its action involves its direct binding to and activation of partner cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6 at the G1-to-S phase transition of the cell cycle (Sherr et al 2016), and considerable evidence points to important CDKindependent actions of cyclin D1 as well (Casimiro et al 2015). Rearrangements involving the CCND1 locus appear to occur in up to 8% of parathyroid adenomas (Yi et al 2008) and cyclin D1 protein overexpression occurs in 18-40% (Hsi et al 1996, Tominaga et al 1999, Vasef et al 1999, Hemmer et al 2001, Ikeda et al 2002, Alvelos et al 2013), suggesting the existence of additional, still unknown, genetic mechanisms that lead to cyclin D1 oncoprotein overexpression in these tumors ( Fig.…”
Section: Cyclin D1/ccnd1mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Targeted expression of cyclin D1 to the mammary gland is sufficient for the induction of mammary tumorigenesis [ 16 , 17 ]. Curiously, forced expression of a cyclin D1 mutant, defective in cdk binding, is also sufficient for the induction of mammary tumors with similar latency [ 17 , 18 ] suggesting additional cdk-independent functions, such as the induction of chromosomal instability [ 19 ] may contribute to the pro-oncogenic phenotype [ 20 , 21 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The mechanisms by which the mitotic kinases govern progression through the cell cycle was thought to involve phosphorylation of the pRB and related proteins [42]. An increasing array of substrates has added greater complexity to this model [51,52]. Phosphorylation of the substrate pRB, by cyclin D1/CDK4 [53] and other kinases [54] results in the release of E2F/DP proteins (E2F-1 - 5).…”
Section: The Cell-cycle and Human Breast Cancermentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Although cyclin D1 was originally categorized within the presumptive ‘proliferative signaling’ category, the expression of cyclin D1 has been shown to be sufficient for the majority of these ‘hallmarks’ and ‘enabling characteristics’. In this regard cyclin D1 has been shown to induce proliferative signaling [33,7174], resistance to cell death [71,75], replicative immortality [76], induction of angiogenesis [77], evading growth suppressors, activating invasion and metastasis [61,65] and enabling capabilities (‘avoiding immune destruction’ [63,64]), ‘tumor promoting inflammation’ [78], ‘deregulated cellular energetics’ [45,47,79,80], ‘genomic instability and mutation’ [51,52] (Figure 1). Although the above models of “cancer hallmarks’ and ‘enabling characteristics’ do not directly embrace the field of cancer stem cells, several studies have shown the importance of cancer stem cells in the onset and progression of cancer [8183] and the importance of cyclin D1 in expanding the pool of stem [84,85] and/or cancer stem cells [86].…”
Section: Cyclin D1 Is Sufficient For the Hallmarks And Enabling Charamentioning
confidence: 99%