2004
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.140.5.577
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Is High Mole Count a Marker of More Than Melanoma Risk?

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Cited by 10 publications
(2 citation statements)
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References 18 publications
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“…However, other cancers show increased risk with allergies, notably lung, with prostate and breast cancers having no relationship to allergies and asthma (1, 2). Skin cancers, including melanoma and non-melanoma histologies, demonstrated differing relationships with allergies in various case-control and cohort studies (38). This lack of clarity may be attributable to various forms of information bias including surveillance bias (cohort studies), varying or indeterminate definitions of allergy, and subject selection bias, which may explain part of the conflicting results (38).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…However, other cancers show increased risk with allergies, notably lung, with prostate and breast cancers having no relationship to allergies and asthma (1, 2). Skin cancers, including melanoma and non-melanoma histologies, demonstrated differing relationships with allergies in various case-control and cohort studies (38). This lack of clarity may be attributable to various forms of information bias including surveillance bias (cohort studies), varying or indeterminate definitions of allergy, and subject selection bias, which may explain part of the conflicting results (38).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Skin cancers, including melanoma and non-melanoma histologies, demonstrated differing relationships with allergies in various case-control and cohort studies (38). This lack of clarity may be attributable to various forms of information bias including surveillance bias (cohort studies), varying or indeterminate definitions of allergy, and subject selection bias, which may explain part of the conflicting results (38). The largest and most recent study of atopic dermatitis and cancer risk indicated an increased risk of all types of skin cancers among individuals with atopic dermatitis (an allergic pathology of the skin) but it was unclear whether the disease, or immune suppressive treatments for the disease, was the cause for the increase (9).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%