2018
DOI: 10.3390/en11041000
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Abstract: Abstract:The aim of this paper is to numerically investigate cooling performances of a non-film-cooled turbine vane coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC) at two turbulence intensities (Tu = 8.3% and 16.6%). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with conjugate heat transfer (CHT) analysis is used to predict the surface heat transfer coefficient, overall and TBC effectiveness, as well as internal and average temperatures under a condition of a NASA report provided by Hylton et al. [NASA CR-168015]. The follow… Show more

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Cited by 9 publications
(3 citation statements)
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References 29 publications
(29 reference statements)
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“…However, this TBC technology alone does not completely perform in advanced gas turbine operating conditions. As highlighted by Prapamonthon et al in their study, TBC does not effectively protect the underlying turbine blade at the trailing edge area [10]. Refer to Figure 1 to see the position of trailing edge in the turbine blade's configuration.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 88%
“…However, this TBC technology alone does not completely perform in advanced gas turbine operating conditions. As highlighted by Prapamonthon et al in their study, TBC does not effectively protect the underlying turbine blade at the trailing edge area [10]. Refer to Figure 1 to see the position of trailing edge in the turbine blade's configuration.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 88%
“…It has been proved that the location, cross-section and mass flow rate of the cooling arrangements are highly influential on the temperature distribution in the vane [18]. Other studies have included thermal barrier coating, the effects of turbulence intensity and material selection [19,20]. Recent developments have suggested replacing compressed air with steam because of its superior heat transfer capabilities.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been used for many years in order to protect critical turbine engine parts (i.e., blades, combustion chambers) from high temperatures and aggressive environments. Along with the development of computer-aided design/computer-aided engineering (CAD/CAE) programs and the enhancement in the computational power of workstations, finite element method (FEM) simulations [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17] are also conducted in addition to laboratory experiments. These simulations are used to analyze complex thermo-mechanical states [1,4,6], heat flow for a variety of coating materials [3], the effect of cooling channels on cooling efficiency [2], or TBC damage during impact loads [8].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%