1985
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.121.5.642
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Interrelationship between water-barrier and reservoir functions of pathologic stratum corneum

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Cited by 76 publications
(65 citation statements)
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“…The SC is easily damaged by mechanical stresses, such as scratching, leading to an increase in transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and a decrease in SC hydration, together with desquamation that lasts for more than a week in humans. 1 Such cutaneous barrier disruption is experimentally inducible by various methods, including applications of detergents (e.g. sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS), defatting with acetone and physical insults, such as tape stripping, which remove SC cell layers.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The SC is easily damaged by mechanical stresses, such as scratching, leading to an increase in transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and a decrease in SC hydration, together with desquamation that lasts for more than a week in humans. 1 Such cutaneous barrier disruption is experimentally inducible by various methods, including applications of detergents (e.g. sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS), defatting with acetone and physical insults, such as tape stripping, which remove SC cell layers.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…On the other hand, the increase in TEWL in lesional psoriatic epidermis has been well documented (Tagami and Yoshikuni, 1985;Serup and Blichmann, 1987). Also hydration by bound water in the psoriatic lesions appears to be inferior to control skin (Takenouchi et al, 1986).…”
Section: Figurementioning
confidence: 94%
“…The stratum corneum is the outermost layer of epidermis which is directly in contact with the surrounding environment. It has an important role in hydration control and tactile friction (Tagami and Yoshikuni, 1985). The next layer in the skin structure is dermis.…”
Section: Skin Tribologymentioning
confidence: 99%