Constraints in Phonological Acquisition 2004
DOI: 10.1017/cbo9780511486418.005
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Input elaboration, head faithfulness, and evidence for representation in the acquisition of left-edge clusters in West Germanic

Abstract: Preliminaries 1Several recent investigations of the development of left-edge clusters in West Germanic languages have demonstrated that the relative sonority of adjacent consonants plays a key role in children's reduction patterns (e.g. Fikkert 1994, Gilbers & Den Ouden 1994, Chin 1996, Barlow 1997, Bernhardt & Stemberger 1998, Gierut 1999, Ohala 1999.These authors have argued that, for a number of children, at the stage in development when only one member of a left-edge cluster is produced, it is the least so… Show more

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Cited by 89 publications
(36 citation statements)
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References 59 publications
(29 reference statements)
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“…Much of the previous research on the acquisition of consonant clusters has been carried out in English, and this has generally focused on word-initial clusters (e.g., Templin, 1957;Chin & Dinnsen, 1992;Smit, 1993;Barlow, 1997;2001;Gierut, 1999;2001;Pater & Barlow, 2003;Gnanadesikan, 2004;Goad & Rose, 2004). Much of this research has examined children's consonant cluster reduction patterns, and whether these are best explained by sonority (e.g., Ohala, 1999;Pater & Barlow, 2003;Gnanadesikan, 2004), headedness (Goad & Rose, 2004), or directionality, (i.e., whether C1 or C2 is more likely to be preserved (Lleó & Prinz, 1996); see also Fikkert & Freitas, 2004).…”
Section: The Acquisition Of Consonant Clustersmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Much of the previous research on the acquisition of consonant clusters has been carried out in English, and this has generally focused on word-initial clusters (e.g., Templin, 1957;Chin & Dinnsen, 1992;Smit, 1993;Barlow, 1997;2001;Gierut, 1999;2001;Pater & Barlow, 2003;Gnanadesikan, 2004;Goad & Rose, 2004). Much of this research has examined children's consonant cluster reduction patterns, and whether these are best explained by sonority (e.g., Ohala, 1999;Pater & Barlow, 2003;Gnanadesikan, 2004), headedness (Goad & Rose, 2004), or directionality, (i.e., whether C1 or C2 is more likely to be preserved (Lleó & Prinz, 1996); see also Fikkert & Freitas, 2004).…”
Section: The Acquisition Of Consonant Clustersmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Based on the Sonority Sequencing Generalisation, according to which the members of an onset cluster increase in sonority from left to right, as well as based on the behaviour of word‐initial /s/ in Romance languages and reduplication patterns in Gothic, many researchers have argued that /s/ is not part of the onset. Instead it is thought of as being either part of an appendix, or in fact a coda of a preceding (empty) syllable (Goad & Rose ). This might explain the differences in the developmental trajectory of /s/‐obstruent clusters as opposed to obstruent‐sonorant clusters.…”
Section: The Acquisition Of Complex Onsets At Word Beginningsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…An example of various developmental pathways for one phenomenon can be seen in the acquisition of onset clusters. A very common phenomenon in early phonological acquisition (across a wide variety of languages) is the reduction of word‐initial consonant clusters (e.g., for Dutch: Beers ; Jongstra ; Gerrits & Zumach ; for English: Barlow b; Yavas & Core ; Norwegian: Kristoffersen & Simonsen ; cross‐linguistic Germanic (and Hebrew): Goad & Rose ; Yavas et al 2007). Dutch children typically say [bum] for the word bloem /blum/ ‘flower’.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Nous disposons donc, pour l'élaboration des items, d'un contraste labial / dorsal. Le choix de l'occlusive labiale [p] à la place d'une occlusive coronale qui présente sensiblement le même degré de complexité est conforté par le fait que la labiale, tout comme la dorsale, permettent plus facilement les attaques branchantes du type [pl] et [kl], ce qui n'est pas le cas de la coronale, l'attaque branchante [tl] étant peu attestée dans les langues du monde(Goad & Rose, 2004). Pour le contraste de mode, nous avons choisi le contraste occlusif / fricatif en sélectionnant la fricative [f], le mode d'articulation fricatif étant considéré comme plus complexe que le mode d'articulation occlusif.…”
unclassified
“…Cette consonne permet l'addition des groupes consonantiques complexes suivants : #sCV, #sCCV, sC# et Cs#. Ces groupes consonantiques sont peu fréquents dans les langues du monde(Goad & Rose, 2004), mais sont présents en français d'où le terme d'items LD. Pour la construction des items LD, les codas internes ont également été utilisées, ce qui n'a pas été le cas pour les items LI.…”
unclassified