1992
DOI: 10.1037/0735-7044.106.6.992
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Abstract: The influences of hypothyroidism on behavioral measures of the taste function in male and female Long-Evans rats were determined. Experimental rats' preferences for and ability to detect NaCl, HCl, sucrose, and quinine sulfate were examined before, during, and after 9 weeks of maintenance on 0.1% propylthiouracil (PTU), an agent that produces marked hypothyroidism, with similar determinations made for control animals. Despite significant decreases in PTU-treated rats' serum triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxin (… Show more

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Cited by 17 publications
(5 citation statements)
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References 27 publications
(57 reference statements)
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“…Likewise, we cannot completely exclude the possibility of Fos induction by fastingrelated metabolic changes, which could be different between the euthyroid and hypothyroid rats. PTU treatment in rats altered preference taste behavior independent of hypothyroidism (6). In the present study, the body weight increase of the PTU-treated rats was smaller than control rats.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 57%
“…Likewise, we cannot completely exclude the possibility of Fos induction by fastingrelated metabolic changes, which could be different between the euthyroid and hypothyroid rats. PTU treatment in rats altered preference taste behavior independent of hypothyroidism (6). In the present study, the body weight increase of the PTU-treated rats was smaller than control rats.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 57%
“…Apparently, patients with BMS are affected by dysgeusia, a phenomenon that occurs frequently with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors [131]. Thyroid hormones have been shown to influence the maturation and specialisation of the taste buds [132], and it has been speculated that hypothyroidism could therefore lead to a reduction in taste. Other investigators [133] have suggested a dysfunction of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway that may account for the development of BMS.…”
Section: Pathophysiology Of Selected Side-effects (Involved Targets) mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Some patients, in addition to the sensation of burning, also present alterations in taste ( 26 ), this happens more frequently when there are thyroid alterations ( 20 ), in which, due to latent or subclinical hypothyroidism, they are more predisposed to dysgeusia or ghost tastes ( 15 ). Thyroid hormones are related to the maturation and specialization of the taste buds ( 14 ). Braud et al ( 27 ) in their study showed altered taste sensitivity in BMS patients, with increased thresholds of fungiform and foliate taste buds.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The thyroid gland secretes triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) hormones that play an important role in tissue development and metabolism, as well as in the regulation of numerous functions and processes of the nervous system ( 13 ). Additionally, thyroid hormones have been shown to play a role in the maturation and specialization of taste buds ( 14 ). Therefore, the deficiency of these hormones can play a role in dysgeusia ( 15 ) and in peripheral/central neuropathies ( 13 , 15 ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%