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Abstract: Background: As the population of older adults quickly increases, the incidence of frailty syndrome, a reduction in physiological reserve across multiple physiological systems, likewise increases. To date, impaired balance has been associated with frailty; however, the underlying frailty-related postural balance mechanisms remain unclear. Objective: The aim of the current study was to use open-loop (OL; postural muscles) and closed-loop (CL; postural muscles plus sensory feedback) mechanisms to explore differen… Show more

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Cited by 24 publications
(44 citation statements)
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References 27 publications
(55 reference statements)
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“…This finding is consistent with previous work that identified body sway as an insensitive characterization of postural control to identify pre-frail participants from non-frail ones in a non-PAD sample (19). Another explanation could be the small sample size in our study.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 93%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…This finding is consistent with previous work that identified body sway as an insensitive characterization of postural control to identify pre-frail participants from non-frail ones in a non-PAD sample (19). Another explanation could be the small sample size in our study.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 93%
“…These technologies are highly valid and practical and offer a promising, cost-effective way to analyze gait and balance parameters associated with frailty in the clinical setting (17-19). Using such technologies may facilitate identifying frailty in intermediate stages (i.e., pre-frailty) where its identification is more difficult using clinical or “eye-ball” judgments.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Although several previous studies have associated fall risk with lack of strength and function in lower-extremity muscles [3337], current findings suggest that upper-extremity function may also related to higher rates of falls. This observation suggests that this lack of strength or function seen in older adults may be systematic and related to dynapenia and sarcopenia seen with aging, influencing both lower- and upper-extremity performance.…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
confidence: 79%
“…In previous research, poor balance and fall risk have been related to lack of physiological reserve and frailty among older adults [4,3739]. However, measuring frailty in those who are at higher risk of falling, especially older adults who are admitted for fall injuries, still requires further research.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Previous work does suggest longer turning duration in frail compared to non-frail older adults during timed-up-and-go test [26]. Cautious-sitting may be related to poor balance, impaired local muscle balance control, and higher dependency on central somatosensory feedback, which have all been observed in frail individuals [3335]. …”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%