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Cited by 23 publications
(16 citation statements)
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“…Chitin-degrading enzymes are naturally produced by fungi, bacteria, plants, yeasts, insects, and even vertebrates, among various organisms (Bhattacharya et al 2007; Keyhani and Roseman 1996). However, enzymes potentially appropriate for GlcNAc production from chitin at industrial scale are thermostable enzymes obtained from fungi (Østergaard and Sejr Olsen 2010). Fungal thermostable enzymes are currently used in industry, e.g., α-amylase in baking, because they tolerate high temperature, use shorter times to complete conversion, and have a long shelf life (Kristjansson 1989; Østergaard and Sejr Olsen 2010).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Chitin-degrading enzymes are naturally produced by fungi, bacteria, plants, yeasts, insects, and even vertebrates, among various organisms (Bhattacharya et al 2007; Keyhani and Roseman 1996). However, enzymes potentially appropriate for GlcNAc production from chitin at industrial scale are thermostable enzymes obtained from fungi (Østergaard and Sejr Olsen 2010). Fungal thermostable enzymes are currently used in industry, e.g., α-amylase in baking, because they tolerate high temperature, use shorter times to complete conversion, and have a long shelf life (Kristjansson 1989; Østergaard and Sejr Olsen 2010).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, enzymes potentially appropriate for GlcNAc production from chitin at industrial scale are thermostable enzymes obtained from fungi (Østergaard and Sejr Olsen 2010). Fungal thermostable enzymes are currently used in industry, e.g., α-amylase in baking, because they tolerate high temperature, use shorter times to complete conversion, and have a long shelf life (Kristjansson 1989; Østergaard and Sejr Olsen 2010). Fungal thermophilic NAGases with a temperature optimum of 50–65 °C have been characterized from fungi, i.e., Aspergillus niger (Pera et al 1997), Beauvaria bassiana (Bidochka et al 1993), Lentinula edodes (Konno et al 2012), Trichoderma harzianum (Ulhoa and Peberdy 1991; Lorito et al 1994; Lisboa De Marco et al 2004; Koga et al 1991), and Penicillium oxalicum (Ryslava et al 2011) .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In the past decade, advances in protein identification techniques and genome sequencing have enabled detailed investigation of the secretomes of saprophytic (31,42,47,50,51), pathogenic (28,35,43), and symbiotic fungal species (29), revealing rich and diverse enzyme arrays. The fungal secretomes have been explored to find enzymes and enzyme combinations for various industrial applications, such as paper, textile, and food manufacture (7,33) and economically and industrially sustainable hydrolysis of plant biomass to fermentable sugars for biofuel production (1,13,46,51).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…About 75% of the industrially used enzymes come from merely five genera of fungi 22 , reflecting a phylogenetic bias in those exploited to date. Most of the roughly 120,000 named fungi have never been assessed for potentially exploitable properties; and that 120,000 is at most 7% of all predicted fungi.…”
Section: Why Another Fungal Culture Collection Centre In India?mentioning
confidence: 99%