2018
DOI: 10.18632/aging.101582
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Abstract: Ames dwarf (Prop1df) mice possess a loss-of-function mutation that results in deficiency of growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone, as well as exceptional longevity. Work in other laboratories suggests that increased respiration and lipid utilization are important for maximizing mammalian longevity. Interestingly, these phenotypes are observed in Ames dwarf mice. We recently demonstrated that Ames dwarf mice have hyperactive brown adipose tissue (BAT), and hypothesized that this may in part… Show more

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Cited by 13 publications
(38 citation statements)
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References 27 publications
(38 reference statements)
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“…Data from the current study failed to support our original hypothesis that chronic exposure of these diminutive mutants to increased eT will reduce or eliminate their longevity advantage, by preventing increased heat loss and the consequent increase in energy demand for thermogenesis at standard animal room temperature of 23°C. In contrast to our previous studies in adult mice (Darcy et al, ; Westbrook et al, ), juvenile mice in the current study might adapt to the eT. Thus, the differences we observed in the current study are not of the same magnitude as what was observed in these mice and Ames dwarfs exposed to 30°C for 24 hr in our previous studies (Westbrook, ), or in adult Ames dwarfs housed at this eT for 4 months (Darcy et al, ).…”
Section: Conclusion and Discussioncontrasting
confidence: 99%
“…The suggested importance of exposing juvenile versus adult mice to increased eT is consistent with the well‐documented potential of early life nutritional, hormonal, or environmental interventions to influence adult phenotypic characteristics, including rate of aging and longevity (Barker, ; Bartke & Quainoo, ; Sun et al,). The data generated in adult Ames dwarf mice concerning energy metabolism (Darcy et al, ) are likely influenced by profound suppression of thyroid function in these animals.…”
Section: Conclusion and Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Accordingly, the long-lived GHRKO and Ames mice exhibit improved glucose homeostasis and energy metabolism evidenced by decreased respiratory quotient (RQ) and increased oxygen consumption (VO 2 ). In contrast, bGH mice, with high GH/IGF-1 levels show decreased VO(2) and increased RQ [30,32,33]. Taken together, these animal models suggest that diminished GH/IGF-1 activity improves mitochondrial flexibility and increases the capacity for fat oxidation.…”
Section: Gh/ Igf-1 Effects On Mitochondrial Respiration and Atp Produmentioning
confidence: 92%