1992
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.128.3.368
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Incidence of alopecia areata in lupus erythematosus

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Cited by 26 publications
(10 citation statements)
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“…20,21,34,35 The relationship between AA and LE has been reported only in small series or case reports. 5,12,36,37 Werth et al 37 found that the incidence of AA in patients with LE increased (10% in LE vs 0.42% in control) and our study further quantified the impact of AA with a nearly 4-fold risk for comorbid LE. AA has been reported more frequently in patients with psoriasis than with LE.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 65%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…20,21,34,35 The relationship between AA and LE has been reported only in small series or case reports. 5,12,36,37 Werth et al 37 found that the incidence of AA in patients with LE increased (10% in LE vs 0.42% in control) and our study further quantified the impact of AA with a nearly 4-fold risk for comorbid LE. AA has been reported more frequently in patients with psoriasis than with LE.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 65%
“…Although atopy and autoimmune diseases frequently accompany AA, it is not efficient to routinely screen patients with AA for all of these diseases. 5,[8][9][10][11][12][13][14]21,22,31,32,[35][36][37] We calculated the risk of each atopic or autoimmune disease for patients with AA stratified by every 10 years to elucidate the association between the onset age of AA and various atopic and autoimmune diseases. In patients with childhood AA (onset age \10 years), the only required examinations are for AD and LE.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This was only seen in 16% of our paediatric SLE patients, compared to 40–70% reported for adult SLE patients. 1,22 This may suggest that non-scarring alopecia results from a more chronic disease course, as seen in adults with longstanding SLE, or is underreported by children and parents. The higher prevalence of vascular complications in children again suggests a more severe disease course than adults.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Other associated diseases include secondary verruciform xanthoma, 62 papulonodular dermal mucinosis, 63 and alopecia areata. 64 Differential diagnosis. When extracranial DLE is present, the diagnosis is usually clear.…”
Section: Discoid Lupus Erythematosusmentioning
confidence: 99%