volume 9, issue 4, P525-532 1991
DOI: 10.1016/0730-725x(91)90039-o
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Abstract: Progress in biophysical technology now permits us to monitor aging and precataractous changes in the human ocular lens in vivo as well as in vitro. We are employing two noninvasive techniques to measure changes in lens fluorescence and in one lens water compartment (T2) utilizing Scheimpflug lens fluorescence densitography and magnetic resonance imaging. These studies demonstrate age-related changes in the normal lens as reflected by enhanced fluorescence and longer T2 values. Precataractous changes can also b…

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