2010
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-11515-8_5 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Abstract. The optimistic nature of Transactional Memory (TM) systems can lead to the concurrent execution of transactions that are later found to conflict. Conflicts degrade scalability, and may lead to aborts that increase wasted work, and degrade performance. A promising approach to reducing conflicts at runtime is dynamically, and transparently, reordering the execution of transactions upon discovery of conflicts. This approach has been explored in Software TMs (STMs), but not in Hardware TMs (HTMs). Furthe… Show more

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“…Steal-On-Abort, although initially implemented in software, was later also proposed for an HTM simulator [2]. However, this work assumed hardware extensions to support enqueuing the serialized transactions in each core of the processor.…”
Section: Related Workmentioning
“…The positive side is that it works with currently available HTMs. In fact, this is the de facto technique used with commodity HTMs due to their best-effort nature: because no transaction is guarScheduler SW HW Imprecise Fine-Grained Information ATS [26] χ CAR-STM [11] χ χ Shrink [13] χ χ ProPS [24] χ χ SER [19] χ χ TxLinux [25] χ χ SOA [3,2] χ Seer χ Table 1: Comparison of TM schedulers in terms of: regulating an STM and/or HTM, working without precise information on which transaction caused the abort, and whether it uses multiple fine-grained locks to schedule transactions' execution. Seer, our proposal, is the only scheduler that provides all the following properties: 1) works with HTM; 2) does not require precise feedback on aborts; and 3) and adopts a fine-grained serialization mechanism.…”
Section: Related Workmentioning
“…The common feature of these techniques is that all of them require custom extensions to the hardware architecture in order to speed up operations executed by the scheduler. Similarly, Steal-On-Abort was later re-designed for HTM, and requires specific hardware extensions to support transaction queuing [52]. Unfortunately, the currently available HTM implementations do not offer specialized hardware as required by the above techniques.…”
Section: The Case Of Htmsmentioning