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“…Root colonization is an important trait of rhizobacteria and can be strain specific. There is much evidence in the literature indicating that some rhizobia can colonize the roots of nonlegumes (Gaur et al, 1980;PenaCabriales and Alexander, 1983;Shimshick and Hebert, 1979;Terouchi and Sy6no, 1990). We are presently studying the colonization of the roots of lettuce and maize by rhizobia P31 and R1 and our preliminary results (not shown) indicate that these two strains are very good colonizers.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
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“…Root colonization is an important trait of rhizobacteria and can be strain specific. There is much evidence in the literature indicating that some rhizobia can colonize the roots of nonlegumes (Gaur et al, 1980;PenaCabriales and Alexander, 1983;Shimshick and Hebert, 1979;Terouchi and Sy6no, 1990). We are presently studying the colonization of the roots of lettuce and maize by rhizobia P31 and R1 and our preliminary results (not shown) indicate that these two strains are very good colonizers.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…In maize-legume crop rotation system, the * FAX No: +14186567176. E-mail: chabot@rsvs.ulaval.ca legume -Rhizobiurn symbiosis was improved by inoculating the preceding maize crop with Rhizobium (Gaur et al, 1980), suggesting that the growth of rhizobia could be stimulated in the maize rhizosphere. A recent report shows that Rhizobium leguminosarum bv.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…In fields with a long soybean production history, the nodule occupancy by strains from commercial inoculants did not exceed 18% [78] due to the presence of naturalized rhizobia. Gaur et al [79] showed that where soils harboured naturalized populations of ineffective or moderately effective rhizobia, and the problem of inter-strain competition was severe, inoculation of preceding cereal crop (maize) improved the symbiosis in the succeeding legume (green gram or groundnut). …”
mentioning
“…Its competitiveness may be restricted, however, to soils that contain indigenous bradyrhizobia. , modifying inoculum rates Frederick, 1974a, 1974b), short-and long-term massive inoculation Dunigan et al, 1984), cultivar testing , plant breeding , screening for environmental stress , using soil cores (Sylvester-Bradley, 1984), and even inoculation of a nonlegume crop (Gaur et al, 1980). General methods for applying legume inoculants have been reviewed by Brockwell (1977).…”
Section: Inoculationmentioning
“…Highly competitive but relatively inefficient Bradyrhizobium .japonicum persist in soils throughout the Midwestern USA (Ham, 1980;. Several approaches have been attempted to increase establishment of introduced strains, including changing the time of inoculation , increasing inoculum rate Weaver and Frederick, 1974a;1974b), screening cultivars and strains for compatibility and tolerance of environmental stresses , plant breeding (Devine, 1984;Keyser and Cregan, 1984), and even prior inoculation of nonlegume crops (Gaur et al, 1980). In the field, increased recovery of introduced strains on a commercial cultivar has only been moderately successful in massive inoculation trials Weaver and Frederick, 1974b;Dunigan et al, 1984).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning