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Cited by 39 publications
(20 citation statements)
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“…2), consistent with previous studies (e.g. Siegel et al, 1996;Takahashi and Stanhope, 2013), which may undermine the energy-saving benefits of the Achilles tendon elastic recoil (Ishikawa et al, 2005;Sawicki and Ferris, 2008;Zelik et al, 2014). One possibility is that the foot absorbs substantial energy in rotation of the metatarsophalangeal joints (Bruening et al, 2012;MacWilliams et al, 2003), and that this dissipation is not beneficial to walking economy (Song and Geyer, 2011;Song et al, 2013).…”
Section: Key Scientific Implicationssupporting
confidence: 78%
“…2), consistent with previous studies (e.g. Siegel et al, 1996;Takahashi and Stanhope, 2013), which may undermine the energy-saving benefits of the Achilles tendon elastic recoil (Ishikawa et al, 2005;Sawicki and Ferris, 2008;Zelik et al, 2014). One possibility is that the foot absorbs substantial energy in rotation of the metatarsophalangeal joints (Bruening et al, 2012;MacWilliams et al, 2003), and that this dissipation is not beneficial to walking economy (Song and Geyer, 2011;Song et al, 2013).…”
Section: Key Scientific Implicationssupporting
confidence: 78%
“…Muscle joint torque is usually predicted by inverse dynamics which is a very powerful tool and widely used in gaining insight into the sum of all muscle activity at each joint (Winter, 1990). It has many potential applications in sport and clinic settings, including assessment of the effect of training and therapy, diagnosis of gait pathologies and evaluation of surgical outcomes, etc., (Winter, 1980, Winter andWhite, 1983;Siegel et al, 1996;Stefanyshyn andNigg, 1998, Lenaerts et al, 2008). Thus, joint torque is a meaningful and useful biomechanical parameter during analyzing human movement.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 92%
“…Thus, none of these experimental methods provides a definitive answer on how work performed by muscletendon units about the ankle transfers to nonadjacent segments, or how (mechanistically) ankle push-off facilitates economical gait. Given that both the foot (distal to the ankle) and the knee are estimated to perform substantial negative work during Push-off (Siegel et al, 1996;Takahashi and Stanhope, 2013;Zelik et al, 2015a), some of the ankle push-off work may not directly accelerate the swing limb, nor the COM. Rather, a portion of ankle push-off might instead serve to offset simultaneous energy absorption or dissipation elsewhere in the body (e.g.…”
Section: Limitations Of This Perspectivementioning
confidence: 99%