2016
DOI: 10.18632/aging.101148
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Abstract: Age-associated cognitive impairment is a major health and social issue because of increasing aged population. Cognitive decline is not homogeneous in humans and the determinants leading to differences between subjects are not fully understood. In middle-aged healthy humans, fasting blood glucose levels in the upper normal range are associated with memory impairment and cerebral atrophy. Due to a close evolutional similarity to Man, non-human primates may be useful to investigate the relationships between gluco… Show more

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Cited by 19 publications
(11 citation statements)
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References 42 publications
(50 reference statements)
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“…This small animal (typical length 12cm, 60-120g weight) is arboreal and nocturnal. It has a decade-long lifespan and is a model for studying cerebral aging (Sawiak et al, 2014) and various diseases such as diabetes-related encephalopathy (Djelti et al, 2016), Parkinson’s disease (Mestre-Frances et al, 2018), or Alzheimer’s disease (Kraska et al, 2011). It has a key position on phylogenetic trees of primates and is used to investigate primate brain evolution (Montgomery et al, 2010).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This small animal (typical length 12cm, 60-120g weight) is arboreal and nocturnal. It has a decade-long lifespan and is a model for studying cerebral aging (Sawiak et al, 2014) and various diseases such as diabetes-related encephalopathy (Djelti et al, 2016), Parkinson’s disease (Mestre-Frances et al, 2018), or Alzheimer’s disease (Kraska et al, 2011). It has a key position on phylogenetic trees of primates and is used to investigate primate brain evolution (Montgomery et al, 2010).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Moreover, our findings suggest that increased glucose and AGAP could play a role in cognitive disorders, extending the research of Djelti et al, who found that fasting blood glucose was closely linked to spatial memory performance as well hippocampus or septum volumes in grey mouse lemur. (74) It is interesting to note that we found that ApoE4, increasing age and disorders in anion gap, albumin and glucose have cumulative effects thereby affecting semantic and episodic memory. For example, our neural network model shows that episodic memory is highly predicted by an interplay among Apo E4, anion gap, glucose and lower albumin.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 69%
“…Some personality traits have been linked to some life history traits, such as body weight at birth, showing that some behavioral variations can account for gene dispersal models and, thus, selection (Thomas et al, 2016). Finally, recent evidence of a correlation between glucose homeostasis impairment and cognitive deficits in middle-aged mouse lemurs reinforces the potential role of metabolic function as a risk factor for pathological aging (Djelti et al, 2016), as is the case in humans (Geijselaers et al, 2015). This link represents an interesting opportunity for research on type-2 diabetes as a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases, since mouse lemurs express age-related glucose metabolism disorder, among other systemic disorders, that resemble those observed in humans.…”
Section: Potential Markers Of Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms Omentioning
confidence: 62%