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citations
Cited by 12 publications
(4 citation statements)
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References 46 publications
(54 reference statements)
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“…As rabbits are prey animals, they tend to be on the alert for danger at all times, especially when reared in pasture. This finding was in agreement with the tonic immobility test: Leprino rabbits showed a higher reactivity when reared in the pen, whereas NZW ones reacted faster when reared in cages, confirming that stressful stimuli positively affect TI (Miranda et al, 2006). NZW rabbits showed the best productive performance (Table 4) both in cage and pen compared to Leprinos.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 85%
“…As rabbits are prey animals, they tend to be on the alert for danger at all times, especially when reared in pasture. This finding was in agreement with the tonic immobility test: Leprino rabbits showed a higher reactivity when reared in the pen, whereas NZW ones reacted faster when reared in cages, confirming that stressful stimuli positively affect TI (Miranda et al, 2006). NZW rabbits showed the best productive performance (Table 4) both in cage and pen compared to Leprinos.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 85%
“…It is not surprising then to find that for neck region there is a somatotopic mapping in the dorsal central gray linked to analgesia [56]. So it was not surprising to find that in the mouse, analgesia is linked to the immobility by clamping [57]. In a previous study [1], we found that either clamping or bandaging the neck region can induce immobility in neonate rats, whereas in adult rats, only clamping can induce it.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 80%
“…Cortisol results in the release of endorphins and endogenous opioids that can act as painkillers within the central nervous system (Boccalon et al 2006). This phenomenon is often termed stress-induced analgesia where a stressful situation results in a human or nonhuman animal not demonstrating signs of pain when injured (Davis 1979;Boccalon et al 2006;Miranda et al 2006). Since the subordinates had the highest cortisol level, they may also have had a high release of these endorphins and as such did not experience the painful stimulation and, therefore, showed no behavioural or physiological changes.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%