2013
DOI: 10.18632/aging.100552
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Abstract: The insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) pathway is a major conserved regulator of aging. Nematode, fruit fly and mouse mutants with reduced IIS signaling exhibit extended lifespan. These mutants are often dwarfs leading to the idea that small body mass correlates with longevity within species. However, when different species are compared, larger animals are typically longer-lived. Hence, the role of IIS in the evolution of life history traits remains unresolved. Here we used comparative approach… Show more

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Cited by 15 publications
(12 citation statements)
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References 37 publications
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“…However, no obvious phenotypic traits, such as dwarfism, were observed. A recent study demonstrated a negative correlation between expression levels of IGF1R in the brain and longevity across a number of diverse rodent species, including the naked mole-rat (Azpurua et al, 2013). Moreover, because no such relationship was seen in tissue from the heart, lung and kidney, the authors suggested that tissue-specific expression in the nervous tissue may be important to the evolution of longevity in mammals.…”
Section: Reconciling Ghr/igf1r Evolution With Life-history Traits Inmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, no obvious phenotypic traits, such as dwarfism, were observed. A recent study demonstrated a negative correlation between expression levels of IGF1R in the brain and longevity across a number of diverse rodent species, including the naked mole-rat (Azpurua et al, 2013). Moreover, because no such relationship was seen in tissue from the heart, lung and kidney, the authors suggested that tissue-specific expression in the nervous tissue may be important to the evolution of longevity in mammals.…”
Section: Reconciling Ghr/igf1r Evolution With Life-history Traits Inmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Patients with type 2 diabetes display memory impairment [ 9 11 ] and anatomic brain alterations including hippocampus and amygdala atrophy [ 13 ]. A phylogenetic study of the longevity of 16 rodent species even concluded that modulation of IGF1R signaling in nervous tissue, but not in the peripheral tissues, is an important factor in the evolution of longevity in mammals [ 14 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A comparative study of 16 rodent species performed by our group provides some clues to the puzzle. We identified a significant negative correlation between the levels of IGF1R and MLS in the brain, but not in peripheral tissues [82]. Thus, lower IIS in the brain may be contributing to evolution of longer lifespan, while IIS in peripheral tissues does not, thus uncoupling the link between lower IIS and small body size.…”
Section: Insulin/igf-1 Signalingmentioning
confidence: 99%