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Cited by 8 publications
(2 citation statements)
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“…These observations are in accordance with Dhaka and Pareek (2008) who reported the incidence of whitefly at its peak at later stages of cotton crop. Thrips also showed almost same pattern of gradually increased numbers (0.67 ± 0.50 to 1.97 ± 0.12) from June to end of July 2018 as studied by Cook et al (2011) and Cook et al (2013), however Albeldano et al (2008) has some different findings that thrips causes more damages during early season and early stages of cotton, but their findings are about ratio of damages not for the population dynamics. Same trend was also recoded for jassid population (1.42 ± 0.08 to 3.00 ± 0.12) round the Border crops and surroundings habitats also have significant effects on populations of sucking insect pest populations of cotton field plots.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 52%
“…These observations are in accordance with Dhaka and Pareek (2008) who reported the incidence of whitefly at its peak at later stages of cotton crop. Thrips also showed almost same pattern of gradually increased numbers (0.67 ± 0.50 to 1.97 ± 0.12) from June to end of July 2018 as studied by Cook et al (2011) and Cook et al (2013), however Albeldano et al (2008) has some different findings that thrips causes more damages during early season and early stages of cotton, but their findings are about ratio of damages not for the population dynamics. Same trend was also recoded for jassid population (1.42 ± 0.08 to 3.00 ± 0.12) round the Border crops and surroundings habitats also have significant effects on populations of sucking insect pest populations of cotton field plots.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 52%
“…Upland cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., is a major commodity grown in the southern U.S., and thrips can be found infesting cotton throughout this region. The most common species found in cotton include tobacco thrips, Frankliniella fusca (Hinds) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae); flower thrips, Frankliniella tritici (Fitch) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae); western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae); onion thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), Thrips tabaci (Lindeman); and soybean thrips, Neohydatothrips variabilis (Beach) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) ( Cook et al 2003 , Albeldaño et al 2008 , Stewart et al 2013 ). Of these species, tobacco thrips is the most abundant in seedling cotton in the Mid-South (Arkansas, Tennessee, Missouri, Mississippi, Louisiana) and the majority of the southeast (Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida) ( Cook et al 2003 , Stewart et al 2013 ).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%