2013
DOI: 10.1093/ilar/ilt040
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IACUC Review of Nonhuman Primate Research

Abstract: This article will detail some of the issues that must be considered as institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs) review the use of nonhuman primates (NHPs) in research. As large, intelligent, social, long-lived, and non-domesticated animals, monkeys are amongst the most challenging species used in biomedical research and the duties of the IACUC in relation to reviewing research use of these species can also be challenging. Issues of specific concern for review of NHP research protocols that are dis… Show more

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Cited by 55 publications
(54 citation statements)
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“…According to Yin et al (2012), who thoroughly reviewed the relevance of the use of various species in dyslipidemia research, the animal species most likely to predict effects of lipid-lowering treatment in dyslipidemic humans is the non-human primate and in particular the rhesus and cynomolgus strains [36]. The use of non-human primates in research should be stringently justified due to their high level of intelligence and sentience [37] but in order to extract the most predictive and relevant information from the current study we decided to use the cynomolgus monkey as our animal model. Furthermore, the animals included were suffering from naturally occurring diabetes type-2, although of such a mild type that treatment by glucose-lowering therapies was not necessary.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…According to Yin et al (2012), who thoroughly reviewed the relevance of the use of various species in dyslipidemia research, the animal species most likely to predict effects of lipid-lowering treatment in dyslipidemic humans is the non-human primate and in particular the rhesus and cynomolgus strains [36]. The use of non-human primates in research should be stringently justified due to their high level of intelligence and sentience [37] but in order to extract the most predictive and relevant information from the current study we decided to use the cynomolgus monkey as our animal model. Furthermore, the animals included were suffering from naturally occurring diabetes type-2, although of such a mild type that treatment by glucose-lowering therapies was not necessary.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Research using all vertebrate animals, including NHPs, and the characteristics of the facilities that house and breed animals are regulated in North America (Griffin and Locke 2016;Tardif et al 2013;Vasbinder and Locke 2016), the European Union (Olsson et al 2016;SCHEER 2017), and some Asian countries, such as China, Japan, and Korea (Ogden et al 2016). In the United States, primary roles for regulating NHP husbandry, breeding, and use is performed by the US Department of Agriculture and the NIH Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare.…”
Section: Governmental and Institutional Regulation Of Nhp Researchmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…). Several studies of captive primates conducted in the USA have recommended social housing for nonhuman primates (see Novak and Suomi [1991] and Tardif et al [2013] for reviews). In addition, numerous international regulating bodies have added social housing as one of the minimum requirements for primates in captivity (see, for example, the Animal Welfare Act regulations, 7 USC § § 2131-2159National Research Council [2011], European Parliament [2010]; Bayne and Morris [2012]).…”
Section: Captive Housingmentioning
confidence: 99%