2019
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Abstract: Diverse temperate forest types and a high atmospheric humidity have recently been suggested for the Eocene source area of Baltic amber. However, ferns are astonishingly rare as inclusions in this amber, which is in contrast to other seed‐free land plants, fungi, and lichens. Moreover, the identities of some of the few described putative fern taxa are dubious, and some fossils were even assigned to the Paleozoic seed fern genera Alethopteris, Pecopteris and to the form genus Sphenopteris containing Paleozoic an… Show more

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Cited by 8 publications
(10 citation statements)
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References 62 publications
(93 reference statements)
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“…Ecological interpretation of amber inclusions of various macro- and microlichens indicates that they probably originated in humid but relatively well-illuminated temperate forests (Kaasalainen et al 2017 a ; Rikkinen & Schmidt 2018). This conclusion is also supported by concurrent findings from recent studies of plant inclusions, naming temperate forests as the most likely source ecosystems (Sadowski et al 2017 a , b , 2019).…”
Section: Introductionsupporting
confidence: 73%
“…Ecological interpretation of amber inclusions of various macro- and microlichens indicates that they probably originated in humid but relatively well-illuminated temperate forests (Kaasalainen et al 2017 a ; Rikkinen & Schmidt 2018). This conclusion is also supported by concurrent findings from recent studies of plant inclusions, naming temperate forests as the most likely source ecosystems (Sadowski et al 2017 a , b , 2019).…”
Section: Introductionsupporting
confidence: 73%
“…Another distinctive parautochthonous source of plant remains is amber, mainly of Cretaceous to Neogene age. Amber can be produced by both conifer (Sadowski et al 2017) and angiosperm trees (Rust et al 2010), and can result in exquisite preservation, especially of delicate structures such as flowers (Poinar 2002;Gandolfo et al 2018), fern sori (Sadowski et al 2019) and even microscopic algae (Schmidt et al 2006). Some of these deposits have been studied since the middle 19 th century, but amber can be a very selective fossil trap (e.g.…”
Section: Local-scale Diversitymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A recent analysis of conifers provided conclusive evidence for a warm temperate Baltic amber forest including coastal swamps, riparian forests, and diverse mesophytic coniferangiosperm assemblages with cypresses (family Cupressaceae), pines (Pinaceae) and now extinct types of conifers (Geinitziaceae) (Sadowski et al 2017). There was also a low diversity of ferns that is reflective of temperate ecosystems (Sadowski et al 2019) and atmospheric humidity was likely high. Analogues to these forests are found today in East Asia and North America, particularly southeastern Asia and along the west coast of the United States but also North Florida and Southeast Georgia.…”
Section: Paleohabitats and Ecologymentioning
confidence: 99%