2011
DOI: 10.3233/jad-2011-110356
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Abstract: Abstract.The apolipoprotein E (APOE) 4 allele is the major genetic risk factor for the development of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), whereas the presence of the APOE 2 allele seems to confer protection. Here, we report that healthy young APOE 4 carriers have statistically significantly smaller hippocampal volumes than APOE 2 carriers, while no differences were detected between the two groups in memory performance. The difference in hippocampal morphology is cognitively/clinically silent in young adulthoo… Show more

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Cited by 55 publications
(55 citation statements)
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References 19 publications
(29 reference statements)
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“…The current results, however, contrast with past research suggesting e2 is protective (Chiang et al, 2010;Farrer et al, 1997;Helkala et al, 1996;Lippa et al, 1997;Wilson et al, 2002). The results reported here are based on a small sample of e2 carriers, but contribute to the small number of studies that have explored e2 effects on cognition prior to older-adulthood (Alexander et al, 2007;Alexopoulos et al, 2011). Recent papers have reported differential spatial navigation strategies in e2 carriers in youth (Konishi et al, 2016), as well as altered memory function in individuals diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (Freeman et al, 2005;Johnson et al, 2015;Kim et al, 2013).…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
confidence: 54%
“…The current results, however, contrast with past research suggesting e2 is protective (Chiang et al, 2010;Farrer et al, 1997;Helkala et al, 1996;Lippa et al, 1997;Wilson et al, 2002). The results reported here are based on a small sample of e2 carriers, but contribute to the small number of studies that have explored e2 effects on cognition prior to older-adulthood (Alexander et al, 2007;Alexopoulos et al, 2011). Recent papers have reported differential spatial navigation strategies in e2 carriers in youth (Konishi et al, 2016), as well as altered memory function in individuals diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (Freeman et al, 2005;Johnson et al, 2015;Kim et al, 2013).…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
confidence: 54%
“…APOE-ε4 carriers at birth have reduced grey matter volume in temporal areas and increased grey matter volume in frontal areas, suggesting early developmental differences in brain structure dependent on APOE genotype [65; 66]. In young healthy APOE-ε4 carriers (average age of 20–25 years), white and grey matter volumes in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) were reported to be either larger [67], unchanged [56; 6870] or smaller [71; 72]. There are no differences, however, in the temporal cortex or hippocampus of middle-aged adults, although APOE-ε4 carriers had thinner frontal cortices, while APOE-ε2 carriers had thicker parahippocampal cortices [73; 74].…”
Section: Apoe Genotype Effects On the Normal Brainmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…ASM genotypes and ASM activity were initially analysed in 156 healthy individuals enrolled in the GENES study [45,48,49,50]. Further data were obtained from the ASPECT control group (n=133) [31].…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%