2015
DOI: 10.1590/s1415-475738320140252
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Abstract: The leachate generated by the decomposition of animal carcass has been implicated as an environmental contaminant surrounding the burial site. High-throughput nucleotide sequencing was conducted to investigate the bacterial communities in leachates from the decomposition of pig carcasses. We acquired 51,230 reads from six different samples (1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 14 week-old carcasses) and found that sequences representing the phylum Firmicutes predominated. The diversity of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences in the… Show more

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Cited by 10 publications
(47 citation statements)
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References 43 publications
(47 reference statements)
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“…Microbes in these phyla are commonly found in animal gastrointestinal tracts [ 29 ]. Our results were similar to those of [ 30 ], which showed that the sequences matching Firmicutes and Bacteriodetes initially predominated in leachates from swine carcasses, but shifted continuously over time. Genus-level comparisons of bacterial communities between the carcass burial site and manure heap are discussed in section 3.3.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 91%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Microbes in these phyla are commonly found in animal gastrointestinal tracts [ 29 ]. Our results were similar to those of [ 30 ], which showed that the sequences matching Firmicutes and Bacteriodetes initially predominated in leachates from swine carcasses, but shifted continuously over time. Genus-level comparisons of bacterial communities between the carcass burial site and manure heap are discussed in section 3.3.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 91%
“…In addition, Bacteriodetes taxa detected in the carcass leachate (Porphyromonadaceae [unclassified genus] [6.2%], Bacteroidales [unclassified genus] [7.3%]) differed markedly from those in the manure heap ( Flavobacterium [13.9%], Flavobacteriaceae) [unclassified genus] [9.0%], Porphyromonadaceae [unclassified genus] [5.8%]). Interestingly, the bacterial composition differed from that in a previous study [ 30 ], in which the bacterial communities in decomposing swine carcass leachates showed a predominance of uncultured Tissierella spp. and Peptostreptococcus spp.…”
Section: Resultscontrasting
confidence: 86%
“…These continually shifting bacterial communities in leachates might affect the surrounding environment, including soil and groundwater at or near the burial site, and lead to changes in the composition of organic materials, indigenous microbes, and symbionts. In agreement with results of this study, bacterial communities in leachates from decomposing swine carcasses were also shown to change continuously throughout decomposition [ 12 ]. These results showed the potential for opportunistic pathogens in burial leachates to multiply during decomposition.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 89%
“…To date, only a few studies have examined the characteristics of uncultured microbial communities in burial sites [ 11 , 12 ]. The presence of uncultivable bacteria has been demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), although these studies were limited by low detection rates of microbes in landfill leachate plumes [ 11 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Carcasses contain significant amounts of organic N that can be hydrolyzed to ammonia under aerobic conditions, and which then can be further oxidized to nitrite (by nitrosomonas) and then nitrate (by nitrobacters) (Anthonisen et al, 1976). Highthroughput nucleotide sequence analysis can provide insight in bacterial community successions for buried animal carcasses (Yang et al, 2015).…”
Section: Digestate Qualitymentioning
confidence: 99%