2015
DOI: 10.18632/aging.100759
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Abstract: Diet and sex are important determinants of lifespan. In humans, high sugar diets, obesity, and type 2 diabetes correlate with decreased lifespan, and females generally live longer than males. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a classical model for aging studies, and has also proven useful for characterizing the response to high‐glucose diets. However, studies on male animals are lacking. We found a surprising dichotomy: glucose regulates lifespan and aging in a sex‐specific manner, with beneficial effects… Show more

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Cited by 23 publications
(29 citation statements)
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References 33 publications
(53 reference statements)
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“…To better understand the metabolic and phenotypic consequences of this change, we modeled a high-glucose diet in C. elegans. Addition of glucose to the media decreased lifespan similar to previous studies (5)(6)(7)(8)12), and higher concentrations of supplemental glucose resulted in correspondingly shorter lifespans ( Fig. 1A and SI Appendix, Table S1).…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 85%
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“…To better understand the metabolic and phenotypic consequences of this change, we modeled a high-glucose diet in C. elegans. Addition of glucose to the media decreased lifespan similar to previous studies (5)(6)(7)(8)12), and higher concentrations of supplemental glucose resulted in correspondingly shorter lifespans ( Fig. 1A and SI Appendix, Table S1).…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 85%
“…By 5 d of age, animals grown on 2% added glucose declined approximately threefold faster than control for locomotion both in liquid and on solid media. Interestingly, previous studies demonstrated that a high-glucose diet decreases locomotion on solid media when animals are middle aged (day 10 or 14 of adulthood) (11,12). Therefore, these data show that a highglucose diet decreases mobility even in young animals.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 60%
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“…In contrast, a heterozygous mutation of the mouse ETC protein gene Risp decreased median life span in males but tended to increase maximum life span in females [75] . Finally, in C. elegans a high-glucose diet was reported to decrease hermaphrodite life span but slightly increase male life span [76] ; and similarly, mutation of the Daf-12 steroid-like hormone receptor was reported to decrease hermaphrodite life span but slightly increase male life span [10] . Taken together these data demonstrate that males and females can sometimes respond in opposite directions to the same dietary or genetic intervention, consistent with sex-specific and sometimes sexually antagonistic regulation of life span.…”
Section: Increased Median Life Span Is Not Always Indicative Of Slowementioning
confidence: 99%