2018
DOI: 10.18632/aging.101578
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Abstract: Aging is associated with the accumulation of DNA damage. High expression of DNA repair genes has been suggested to contribute to prolonged lifespan in several organisms. However, the crucial DNA repair genes contributing to longevity remain unknown. Termite kings have an extraordinary long lifespan compared with that of non-reproductive individuals such as workers despite being derived from the same genome, thus providing a singular model for identifying longevity-related genes. In this study, we demonstrated … Show more

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Cited by 9 publications
(12 citation statements)
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“…In species with AQS, the longer longevity of the primary king appears as a constant. In this line of evidence, several genes associated to DNA repair were shown to be significantly upregulated in both somatic and reproductive tissues of kings of R. speratus compared to queens (Tasaki et al 2018). However, further studies are warranted in order to understand how and why such asymmetry in longevity arose between sexes in species with AQS, breaking lifelong monogamy.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 89%
“…In species with AQS, the longer longevity of the primary king appears as a constant. In this line of evidence, several genes associated to DNA repair were shown to be significantly upregulated in both somatic and reproductive tissues of kings of R. speratus compared to queens (Tasaki et al 2018). However, further studies are warranted in order to understand how and why such asymmetry in longevity arose between sexes in species with AQS, breaking lifelong monogamy.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 89%
“…A recent comparative analysis including one termite, one ant and several bee species, also did not obtain consistent results of an association between oxidative stress and longevity [ 38 ]. For the termite Reticulitermes speratus , it has been suggested that queens are better protected against oxidative stress as qRT-PCRs studies showed a higher expression of the antioxidants catalases and peroxiredoxins in queens compared to workers [ 33 ], while kings were characterized by a high expression of BRCA1 (in the fat body) compared to workers [ 31 ]. Unfortunately, the age of the studied reproductives is not known.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Hence, other mechanisms must exist to explain the long life of termite queens. Studies of the subterranean termite Reticulitermes speratus implicated the involvement of a breast cancer type 1 susceptibility (BRCA1 ) homolog [ 31 ], which is involved in DNA repair [ 32 ], and better protection against oxidative stress by superoxide dismutases and catalases [ 33 , 34 ]. The latter has also been discussed for other social Hymenoptera, including ants and the honeybee.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These studies have shown that higher expression of oxidative stress response genes do not necessarily correlate with longer lifespans. For the termite Reticulitermes speratus, it has been suggested that queens are better protected against oxidative stress as qRT-PCRs studies showed a higher expression of the antioxidants catalases and peroxiredoxins in queens compared to workers [17], while kings were characterized by a high expression of BRCA1 (in the fat body) compared to workers [15]. Unfortunately, the age of the studied reproductives is not known.…”
Section: Comparison With Other Social Insectsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Hence, other mechanisms must exist to explain the long life of termite queens. Studies of the subterranean termite Reticulitermes speratus implicated the involvement of a breast cancer type susceptibility (BRCA1) homolog [15], which is involved in DNA repair [16], and better protection against oxidative stress by superoxide dismutases and catalases [17,18]. The latter have also been discussed for other social Hymenoptera, including ants and the honeybee.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%