2009
DOI: 10.1075/sl.33.3.02pie
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Hiberno-English medial-object perfects reconsidered

Abstract: Perfects of the type I have my dinner eaten are a well-known feature of Irish English dialects. They can be linked to a functionally similar construction in Irish, of the type tá mo dhinneár ite agam (literally "is my dinner eaten at-me"), but also to earlier constructions in Standard English. The issue has sometimes been treated as a competition between two seemingly mutually exclusive explanations, a "substrate" and a "retentionist" hypothesis.This dichotomy can be overcome on the basis of a model of "contac… Show more

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Cited by 21 publications
(7 citation statements)
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“…However, there are clear indications that certain uses can indeed be plausibly traced to such origins: the uses in (4) and (6) above, for example, expressing appeals for agreement and mitigation, are dramatically reflective of the same functions in British English, also shown in (22) and (23) above. Such uses could well have been transferred in a situation resembling the "retentionist" contact situations described by Pietsch (2009), for example, in the development of Hiberno-English. In retentionist situations, the historically earlier functions of a grammatical item transmitted at the time of contact are retained in the replica language until the present day, not undergoing the same changes which have taken place in the lexifier since the time of contact, for example, the medial-object perfect of 18th century British English (as in I have my dinner eaten), retained in present-day Hiberno English, as pointed out by Pietsch (2009).…”
Section: 33mentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…However, there are clear indications that certain uses can indeed be plausibly traced to such origins: the uses in (4) and (6) above, for example, expressing appeals for agreement and mitigation, are dramatically reflective of the same functions in British English, also shown in (22) and (23) above. Such uses could well have been transferred in a situation resembling the "retentionist" contact situations described by Pietsch (2009), for example, in the development of Hiberno-English. In retentionist situations, the historically earlier functions of a grammatical item transmitted at the time of contact are retained in the replica language until the present day, not undergoing the same changes which have taken place in the lexifier since the time of contact, for example, the medial-object perfect of 18th century British English (as in I have my dinner eaten), retained in present-day Hiberno English, as pointed out by Pietsch (2009).…”
Section: 33mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Such uses could well have been transferred in a situation resembling the "retentionist" contact situations described by Pietsch (2009), for example, in the development of Hiberno-English. In retentionist situations, the historically earlier functions of a grammatical item transmitted at the time of contact are retained in the replica language until the present day, not undergoing the same changes which have taken place in the lexifier since the time of contact, for example, the medial-object perfect of 18th century British English (as in I have my dinner eaten), retained in present-day Hiberno English, as pointed out by Pietsch (2009). journal of language contact 11 (2018) 32-70 Gupta (2006) also questions the pronunciation of what in present-day sce, suggesting that the spelling should follow the pronunciation in omitting the final /t/, and represent it as wo or woh.…”
Section: 33mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Letters have provided data for linguistic studies of IrE, beginning with Montgomery's () survey of possible Ulster influences on Appalachian dialects. There is by now a large body of studies based on linguistic data from letters, either partly (Filppula ; Hickey , ) or entirely (Montgomery , ; McCafferty , , ; Pietsch , ; McCafferty & Amador‐Moreno ). Linguists are more interested in the linguistic forms used by letter writers than in the letters’ contents.…”
Section: The Value Of Personal Letters In Linguistic Researchmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Filppula (: 107–116), Hickey (: 208–212) and Pietsch () have each shown that this construction existed in Elizabethan English, and that a parallel construction existed in Irish; and the fact that the construction is no longer a part of standardised or dialectised English in England and only occurs in Ireland is evidence that its retention has been influenced by contact with and transfer from Irish. Pietsch explains the transfer in terms of grammaticalisation whereby the changing of word order has weakened the core meaning and led to a semantic narrowing with the resultative as the outcome.…”
Section: The Present Perfect Construction In Ice‐irelandmentioning
confidence: 99%