2009
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Abstract: Epidemiological studies have indicated that excessive alcohol consumption leads to cognitive impairment, but the specific pathological mechanism involved remains unknown. The present study evaluated the association between heavy alcohol intake and the neuropathological hallmark lesions of the three most common neurodegenerative disorders, i.e., Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and vascular cognitive impairment (VCI), in post-mortem human brains. The study cohort was sampled from the s… Show more

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“…The protective effect of moderate drinking was confirmed in prospective studies [146]. Instead, heavy drinking usually leads to cognitive disorders, but brain lesions [147] as well as cognitive deficits [148–150] are different in alcohol-related dementia and AD. APOE was found to modulate the link between alcohol and AD [151].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
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“…The protective effect of moderate drinking was confirmed in prospective studies [146]. Instead, heavy drinking usually leads to cognitive disorders, but brain lesions [147] as well as cognitive deficits [148–150] are different in alcohol-related dementia and AD. APOE was found to modulate the link between alcohol and AD [151].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…The finding revealed that moderated alcohol consumption may protect HEC slice and cerebellar cultures against glycoprotein 120 (the potent neurodegenerative agent)-induced neurodegeneration. In a postmortem study focused on the relationship between alcohol consumption and neurodegenerative lesion, heavy and chronic alcohol consumption was unable to lead to the obvious neuropathologic lesions (assessed by vascular lesions or the accumulation of amyloid-β peptide, hyperphosphorylated τ protein and α-synuclein) (Aho et al, 2009). On the other hand, epidemiological survey has shown that excessive alcohol consumption can result in overt cognitive dysfunction (Saunders et al, 1991; Hillbom, 1998; Letenneur, 2004).…”
Section: Alcohol Consumption and Risk Of Dementiamentioning
“…As a testament to this, 93% of post mortem analyses showed AD pathological features [19]. As alcohol consumption alone does not significantly increase the accumulation of amyloid beta or hyperphosphorylated tau, this minimizes the possibility of patients with cognitive decline caused by heavy alcohol use being misclassified as AD [44]. The cohort's baseline mMMSE of more than 30 ensured that the patients had relatively mild AD at the beginning of the study and therefore we were able to see the full effects of alcohol use over the course of the disease.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning