2008
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.144.4.538
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Health Promotion Programs for Melanoma Prevention

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Cited by 10 publications
(8 citation statements)
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References 12 publications
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“…In the public health literature, the notion that mass media campaigns might provide a time-limited trigger for prompting behaviour change has not been well appreciated, with some lamenting the absence of long-term effects of only short-run campaigns. Funding authorities often assume that after a period of initial investment, media campaigns might be expected to require very little ongoing support [24]. This suggests a basic misunderstanding of the capability of mass media campaigns to produce durable effects on behaviours like quitting smoking.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In the public health literature, the notion that mass media campaigns might provide a time-limited trigger for prompting behaviour change has not been well appreciated, with some lamenting the absence of long-term effects of only short-run campaigns. Funding authorities often assume that after a period of initial investment, media campaigns might be expected to require very little ongoing support [24]. This suggests a basic misunderstanding of the capability of mass media campaigns to produce durable effects on behaviours like quitting smoking.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…69 Furthermore, reductions in the incidence of melanoma have been observed, especially among young people, over the decades of this media campaign. 70 The researchers of this Australian study advocate as crucial the need for sustained community-wide organised efforts that include mass media to maintain the positive preventive effects and counter competing forces that promote sunbathing and tanning, such as fashion trends and solarium marketing. 70 …”
Section: Evidence For Health Behaviour Changementioning
confidence: 99%
“…70 The researchers of this Australian study advocate as crucial the need for sustained community-wide organised efforts that include mass media to maintain the positive preventive effects and counter competing forces that promote sunbathing and tanning, such as fashion trends and solarium marketing. 70 …”
Section: Evidence For Health Behaviour Changementioning
confidence: 99%
“…The evidence from Australia indicates that active prevention efforts, including television advertising campaigns, can be highly effective in improving the population-wide sun-protective behaviors (27), resulting in falling age-specific incidence rates for melanoma in younger birth cohorts (28). In contrast, the United States fails even to enforce policies limiting preadolescent and adolescent tanning bed use (29).…”
Section: Obstacle 3: Interventions Deployed Too Late In Lifementioning
confidence: 99%