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Cited by 11 publications
(8 citation statements)
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References 26 publications
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“…In separate models examining incident CKD, CKD progression and mortality, there was also no detectable modifying effect of BMI on the primary study finding that AKI is independently associated with a higher risk of the development of CKD, CKD progression, and mortality with up to 8 y of follow-up. Several studies have examined the effect of BMI on mortality after AKI over the short term, although these were retrospective [ 18 , 19 , 37 ] or prospective with no comparator group [ 17 , 38 ]. Some studies show that up to 6 months post AKI, higher BMI is protective against mortality, compared to lower BMI [ 17 19 , 38 ].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…In separate models examining incident CKD, CKD progression and mortality, there was also no detectable modifying effect of BMI on the primary study finding that AKI is independently associated with a higher risk of the development of CKD, CKD progression, and mortality with up to 8 y of follow-up. Several studies have examined the effect of BMI on mortality after AKI over the short term, although these were retrospective [ 18 , 19 , 37 ] or prospective with no comparator group [ 17 , 38 ]. Some studies show that up to 6 months post AKI, higher BMI is protective against mortality, compared to lower BMI [ 17 19 , 38 ].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Several studies have examined the effect of BMI on mortality after AKI over the short term, although these were retrospective [ 18 , 19 , 37 ] or prospective with no comparator group [ 17 , 38 ]. Some studies show that up to 6 months post AKI, higher BMI is protective against mortality, compared to lower BMI [ 17 19 , 38 ]. Our findings concur with the largest study prospective study, which found that high body mass index (BMI) did not modify the risk of mortality 1-year post discharge in a cohort of patients with AKI admitted to critical care, compared to those without AKI [ 37 ].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In addition to examining grip strength as a potential predictor of cardiovascular and cancer mortality, investigators have also shown the value of grip strength as a predictor of mortality in other pathologies. These pathologies include, but are not limited to, rheumatoid arthritis in women (relative risk 3.0), 96 type 2 diabetes in men (hazard ratio 0.90), 97 pneumonia (odds ratio 0.97), 98 renal disease (1.76 and 1.81), 99 and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (hazard ratio 1.80). 100 For patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Mohamed-Hussein et al noted a significant difference in mean grip strength between patients admitted to the intensive care who died (5.7kg) compared to those who survived (14.5kg).…”
Section: Grip Strength As a Biomarker Of Future Outcomesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The GVHD is itself a risk factor for mortality [22], and systemic steroid therapy for GVHD treatment can cause infection [23]. Muscle strength itself is a risk factor for mortality in various clinical populations [24][25][26][27]. In the present study, the incidence of sepsis, thrombotic microangiopathy and/or veno-occulusive disease, and respiratory failure increased as muscle strength decreased, and the incidence of NRM within 1 year was signi cantly higher in the low LEMS group than in the middle and high LEMS groups.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%