2018
DOI: 10.1590/0001-3765201820170488
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Growth, Yield and Grain Nutritional Quality in Three Brazilian Pearl Millets (Pennisetum americanum L.) with African or Indian origins

Abstract: In this study, we are presenting recommendations to the best agricultural use as well as for plant breeding of three millet cultivars namely ENA1 and ENA2, which have African origin, and BRS1501 originally from India. These cultivars were evaluated for growth, yield and grain quality traits. The morphological traits evaluated in this study indicated that the African genotypes ENA1 and ENA2 are better than the Indian genotype BRS1501 for no-till farming or to produce forage with 15% of crude protein at flowerin… Show more

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Cited by 5 publications
(5 citation statements)
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“…In this case, the protein bands in prolamin and glutelin were almost invisible. As described by Medici et al (2018), the molecular mass of the prolamin fraction was estimated at 22 kDa, while the molecular mass of glutelin extracted from two varieties of foxtail millet (white and yellow) was difficult to determine, as the SDS-PAGE image revealed many bands along the gel (Kamara, Ming, & Kexue, 2009). This is consistent with the results presented in this study.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 90%
“…In this case, the protein bands in prolamin and glutelin were almost invisible. As described by Medici et al (2018), the molecular mass of the prolamin fraction was estimated at 22 kDa, while the molecular mass of glutelin extracted from two varieties of foxtail millet (white and yellow) was difficult to determine, as the SDS-PAGE image revealed many bands along the gel (Kamara, Ming, & Kexue, 2009). This is consistent with the results presented in this study.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 90%
“…Millet crop is a C4 plant with higher photosynthetic efficiency and tolerance towards temperature and drought. Therefore this cereal is cultivated and used as a major cereal crop species for the people living Indian subcontinent and Africa (Medici et al, 2018). In case of nutritional approach, millet crop was found significant rich in starch, soluble and insoluble dietary fibres, minerals and antioxidants (Ragaee, Abdel-Aal, & Noaman, 2006) and rich source of phytochemicals and micronutrients (Medici et al, 2018).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Therefore this cereal is cultivated and used as a major cereal crop species for the people living Indian subcontinent and Africa (Medici et al, 2018). In case of nutritional approach, millet crop was found significant rich in starch, soluble and insoluble dietary fibres, minerals and antioxidants (Ragaee, Abdel-Aal, & Noaman, 2006) and rich source of phytochemicals and micronutrients (Medici et al, 2018). Nutrient deficiency in population can be overcome by mineral uptake through such organisms which can mineralize and accumulate minerals in the vicinity of rhizosphere.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L) R. Brown is a major staple food crop in the drier parts of the old world, like the Sahelian region of Africa and India. It is the sixth essential cereal worldwide, a staple food for around 90 million people in these regions [2]. Pearl millet can be cultivated in a low-input agrosystem, without costly agronomic inputs during its 90 days cycle, producing higher biomass with good crude protein content (around 15%) for forage than maize or sorghum [3].…”
Section: Mini-reviewmentioning
confidence: 99%