2014
DOI: 10.1177/1064804613516760 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
|

Abstract: In this article, we explore the individual and organizational outcomes associated with a move from traditional buildings to three green buildings. Our findings revealed that high-level organizational measures were not notably affected by the move. Changes were, however, seen in physical well-being and perceived environmental comfort. The primary drivers were air quality and lighting. The need to consider human factors/ergonomics in green building design has been recognized by the Green Building Counci… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance
Select...
2
1
0
4
0

Year Published

2018
2018
2018
2018

Publication Types

Select...
1
1

Relationship

0
2

Authors

Journals

0
4
0
Order By: Relevance
“… Heerwagen (2000) found improvements in emotional and social wellbeing for daytime workers in green buildings but not for shift workers. Singh et al (2010) found reductions in self-reported depression and stress, but Thatcher and Milner (2012 , 2014a , b ) found no improvements in mental wellbeing of employees moving into green buildings. Thatcher and Milner (2016) content that it is not “how green you make it – it’s how you make it green” that counts (p. 195).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
See 2 more Smart Citations
Create an account to read the remaining citation statements from this report. You will also get access to:
  • Search over 1.2b+ citation statments to see what is being said about any topic in the research literature
  • Advanced Search to find publications that support or contrast your research
  • Citation reports and visualizations to easily see what publications are saying about each other
  • Browser extension to see Smart Citations wherever you read research
  • Dashboards to evaluate and keep track of groups of publications
  • Alerts to stay on top of citations as they happen
  • Automated reference checks to make sure you are citing reliable research in your manuscripts
  • 14 day free preview of our premium features.

Trusted by researchers and organizations around the world

Over 130,000 students researchers, and industry experts at use scite

See what students are saying

rupbmjkragerfmgwileyiopcupepmcmbcthiemesagefrontiersapsiucrarxivemeralduhksmucshluniversity-of-gavle
“… Heerwagen (2000) found improvements in emotional and social wellbeing for daytime workers in green buildings but not for shift workers. Singh et al (2010) found reductions in self-reported depression and stress, but Thatcher and Milner (2012 , 2014a , b ) found no improvements in mental wellbeing of employees moving into green buildings. Thatcher and Milner (2016) content that it is not “how green you make it – it’s how you make it green” that counts (p. 195).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…To date, studies of green buildings and wellbeing have primarily focused on an examination of the physical aspects (e.g., thermal comfort, air quality, lighting) of indoor quality, but lack attention to the social impact of HPGBs’ indoor design (e.g., noise, privacy, social contact). Overall, perceived or objectively measured physical features of the buildings such as air quality, temperature and controls, have been shown to be better in green buildings, although not consistently across studies and buildings ( Thatcher and Milner, 2012 , 2014b , 2016 ; Newsham et al, 2013 ; Coleman, 2016 ; Holmgren et al, 2017 ). Subjective measures typically obtained from post-occupancy evaluation studies suggest that “green” buildings are associated with a high workplace satisfaction ( Kim et al, 2005 ; Kato et al, 2009 ; Armitage et al, 2011 ; Thatcher and Milner, 2014b ; Pei et al, 2015 ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…To improve the model, inclusions could be made for considerations of inclusivity and diversity (such as design for women in the workforce) and sustainability (e.g. green ergonomics,Thatcher & Milner, 2014;Thatcher, 2012) resulting in 14 descriptors along the continuum. The weighting of the outcomes along the continuum may be a necessary practice but unique to each organisation (e.g.…”
mentioning